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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a Plane with a Corrugated Bottom and was just wondering if it will restrict my use. I don’t know much about Planes and I guess the 1st thing I need to do learn how to sharpen it, but I bought it specifically for use with a “Shooting Board”.
Can I use this Corrugated Bottom Plane with a Shooting Board to straighten out miters?
 

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It is my understanding that corrugated bottom was to cut down on drag- I see no reason that it would not work for stated use. I am interested in response from those that know!!!
 
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Discussion Starter #3
It is my understanding that corrugated bottom was to cut down on drag- I see no reason that it would not work for stated use. I am interested in response from those that know!!!
Thanks Mike, I didn't realize that was corrugated until after I bought it and Hope I don't have to buy another one. :laughing:
 

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Let's get the corrugated sole question out of the way first. There is absolutely no evidence that a corrugated sole results in reduced drag.
(it was, most likely, a marketing gimmick)

A paraffin waxed sole beats a corrugated sole any day if friction is a real concern.

To answer your main point: the portion of the sole which makes contact with the chute wall on your shooting board is a tiny strip just outboard of the mouth, running the length of the plane. You are fine with a corrugated sole.
 

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Let's get the corrugated sole question out of the way first. There is absolutely no evidence that a corrugated sole results in reduced drag.
(it was, most likely, a marketing gimmick)

A paraffin waxed sole beats a corrugated sole any day if friction is a real concern.

To answer your main point: the portion of the sole which makes contact with the chute wall on your shooting board is a tiny strip just outboard of the mouth, running the length of the plane. You are fine with a corrugated sole.
John, I agree it probably was just a gimmick to sell more planes. Sure makes for less area to flatten though. :yes:
 

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Thanks Mike, I didn't realize that was corrugated until after I bought it and Hope I don't have to buy another one. :laughing:
Don't feel bad I just bought a 5 that turned out to be corrugated - but at 9.95 I cannot complain...........
 

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master sawdust maker
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Let's get the corrugated sole question out of the way first. There is absolutely no evidence that a corrugated sole results in reduced drag.
(it was, most likely, a marketing gimmick)

A paraffin waxed sole beats a corrugated sole any day if friction is a real concern.
Agreed mostly, I dont find any friction difference between the two. when both are waxed. I would like to add that lapping or flattening a corrugated sole is a little quicker then a non corrugated sole since there is less material that is being removed due to the corrugations. and to be honest. when flattening as long as the toe, mouth and heal are all coplaner and flat there is minimal benifit to the entire sole being coplaner meaning if you have a small low spot that is not in the front edge of the toe or near the mouth or on the heal you should be fine. just keep it waxed and enjoy the whisper thin shavings. (the kiddo's love 'em)!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
John, I agree it probably was just a gimmick to sell more planes. Sure makes for less area to flatten though. :yes:
:huh: OK I’m just getting over the fact that I have to learn how to sharpen the iron and now there is a new factor here.:eek:
What is flattening and how often do I have to do that?
 

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What is flattening and how often do I have to do that?
The biggest difference I have observed with corrugated soles is that for my eyes it is not as easy to sight the blade as with a smooth sole. Something about the corrugations makes it more difficult to see the edge of the blade as easily for my eyes as a smooth sole.

I am presuming you have a vintage plane. These were famous for the soles of the plane not being flat.

I have a couple of dozen vintage hand bench planes and have restored perhaps another 6 or 8.

So far I have needed to flatten the soles on all of the planes. Some more than others.

Some were not flat out of the factory. Most have concave soles due to wear over time. This is expected. Many of these planes have decades of hard use.

Flattening and lapping means the same - getting the sole flat. Wema826 mentioned the most important area to be flat which is the toe and around the mouth. This only needs to be done once.

For example, I have experienced that if the leading edge of the mouth is not flat, the shavings will not be consistent thickness.

I use a granite slab as my flat reference surface. I flatten the sole first with 80 grit, then 100 grit. I do not go above 120 grit.

Mark the toe area to the exit of the mouth with indelible pen so you can tell when this area is flat. You can stop when this area is flat.

You mentioned wanting to use this plane on a shooting board.

After you flatten the sole you want to check the sides to see if they are 90 deg to the sole. My vintage planes are almost never 90 deg to the sole.

For my shooting board, I use a Veritas Low Angle Smoother, which does have sides which are 90 deg.

You can sand the sides to get them 90 deg to the sole, but you will need some sort of jig to hold the sole at 90 deg to the sanding surface.

The corrugated sole will work the same as a smooth sole for planing or use in a shooting board.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Thanks Dave and yes it is a vintage plane. The Veritas Low Angle Smoother sure is a beautiful plane but way too expensive for me and that’s why I turned to eBay. Only now you really have me worried and this is exactly why I try to stay away from planes. :shifty:

Anyway I guess now I’ll have to buy a granite slab



 

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Looks like a decent user plane. The blade has been sharpened a lot, but should still work for your shooting board.

If you want to dedicate this for shooting board use, you can glue a piece of wood on the side, then rip this square on the table saw. It will make the side thicker, but you can account for this in the shooting board design.

Woodcraft sell granite slabs they call them granite surface plates.

Any flat surface will work. You can use the table saw top. Just wipe up the top afterwards to clean off any abrasive particles.

I will flatten the sole and sharpen the blade for you if you want to send the plane to me.
 

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A lot of guys use their table saw table to flatten those. Granted, its probably not machinist accurate, but it's almost certainly suitable. There are fellow who will grind them flat as well, I had one done that way and it was far superior to what I did myself. When he grinds them, he also does the sides insuring they are 90º to the soul. That looks like a #6 (?), the charge would be about $60 (+shipping both ways) for it.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
How big a surface do I need to flatten a plane?

I found some granite cutting board trivets on eBay approximately 11 ½” sq.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
It is a No6 and I don’t know but the blade looks better than any blade I ever sharpened. LOL :laughing:



 

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Just a bit of clarity. The corrugated soles should have less friction as there is technically less surface contact. However....in practice it is likely a negligible amount.
 

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A No. 6 has a longer sole about 18in, I think the 11 1/2in granite is a bit too short. Just use the table saw top.

The blade edge looks better than most of my restorations, but I bet this is dull. :yes:
 

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I use a granite surface plate, and wet-or-dry sandpaper to flatten a plane sole. It's an important step especially for smoothing planes.
I've done all my metal planes, but probably only really helps take a fraction of a thousandths shaving with a smoother or jointer. With a Jack or Fore set up for, and used for, their intended purposes, you're really taking off thicker shavings anyway, so it's really not necessary. You can find all sorts of videos on youtube about plane sole flattening.


The corrugated sole was really just a marketing gimmick, even way back then, to make a plane "more desirable", and hence be able to charge a little more for it. Modern testing has shown that it really makes no difference in the performance of the plane.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I was just thinking that maybe I should use my old 605 Bedrock as my shooting plane instead of this new one.

I was going to fix the 605 up last year, but got overwhelmed with other higher priority stuff and it ended up in a box still unassembled. It needs a new blade and handle.

 
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