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Discussion Starter #1
I'm hanging crown moulding (typical profile) along a convoluted contiguous line in a high foyer. The runs and miters vary, and the height and interferences make the project a challenge. But one spot in particular has the project at full stop. Take a look at the image below: The blue line indicates the line that has stumped me.
foyer02.jpg

The slope of the ceiling is 30°. The crown follows this slope, then must turn 90° (forming an outside corner) for a horizontal run, then turn another 90° (forming an inside corner) to resume the 30° slope. My problem is, I cannot figure out how to transition the crown at these two corners.

I've modeled the area in CADD to help me evaluate options with actual geometry:
Foyer Crown Moulding Study 01.jpg

The image below illustrates the problem. The trim shown in the image are identical. You can really see how the ceiling slope creates a transition problem at the corners.
Foyer Crown Moulding Study 02.jpg
I looked at pendants in CADD; They look ridiculous, so I am not going that route.

I found that a smaller-dimension identical-profile crown sorta works at the corners. The transitions aren't perfect, but close enough given the height. I'm more concerned that the smaller trim used for the horizontal run will look disproportionate.
Foyer Crown Moulding Study 03.jpg

That's my dilemma. I've checked out whitepapers about trim compromises by both Gary Stiegler and Gary Katz, but to no avail.
Any experienced trim carpenters have some suggestions for me to consider?
 

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Generic Weeb
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I'd see how close you can get it, then see if you can sand and carve the moulding slightly to make it match up. looks pretty high up, makes it so unless you're really looking you might not see it. Is this paint grade? That would make it even easier, if needed you could add to it with Bondo.

-T
 

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Crown going up the rake is made as a different profile to match. Do a Google search for crown moulding rake angle and you should see what I'm talking about. There was a good article on Gary Katz website.
 

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That Guy
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The problem that I see is that Crown moulding is made to fit into a 90 degree inside corner and the middle section isn't 90 degrees. The two end sections are still 90 degrees because your raking them with the ceiling but the center section is now a 60 degree inside corner.

So... take the center section of crown moulding and run it through your table saw to change the angle of the wood face that touches the ceiling and wall so they are 60 degrees instead of 90 degrees. Now it will fit into the 60 degree inside corner.

Since the ceiling is white I'd cut the top side, the moulding is going to get smaller and you'll lose some of the profile off the top but what's left from the bottom up will match the two end pieces that rake up on either side.
 

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your overthinking it
the ceiling is flat where the blue line is, anyone can run crown flat at 90°
you'll need to measure carefully at the angled wall perpendicular from the ceiling

the transition on both ends of the blue line are where you will run into problems
 

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Discussion Starter #9
you're overthinking it
e'yup... I definitely was overthinking it.

I followed a recommendation to assemble all the pieces of crown on the ground, hoist the thing as a unit up to the apex, and simply pivot it 30° to meet the ceiling slope. I did just that, and it's presently hung. I still can't believe I didn't see this simple solution! ...grrr!

crown1.jpg
 
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