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Got a fireplace that sits in a corner so that there are 2 forty five degree angles in the room. Do you actually cope the molding for this type corner, or is a plain miter the best that can be done?

Thanks
 

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For me, there are a few things I consider before making the final cuts. I always make a test cut (or two, or three) with two, 12" long pieces to see how a straight-forward miter is going to work. I use a Bosch miter finder these days, so getting an accurate cut is simple. If it looks like the miter is going to work, I go that way. If there are undulations in the ceiling or wall close to the corner, I may go with coping. I consider if it's stained or painted molding as I can cheat a little with painted (read: caulk). I only do crown a few times a year but must say that I end up coping most of my inside joints. Just seems like a better and tighter fit.
 

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In this situation, I like to miter. Like Rob said , do some testing to perfect the angles. I always cope 90 degree inside corners though.
 

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If you miter it will probably open up over time. I know it's a difficult cope but it's the right way to do it. Cope it.
 

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Well I guess I stand corrected, miter is not a bad way to go if it's done right. I was taught to always cope inside corners, and all the old (1900ish) homes I work on have inside corners coped. But I guess there's more than one correct way.

I see he's using that special coping shoe I've heard so much about. I gotta git me one o them. :yes:
 

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I have always coped, cut the bevel a little extreme, and just a tad to long so that I can crush the thin fibers against the adjoing piece. When I say "crush" it is really imperceptrible but if gives you a slight head start when the longituduanl shrinkage, which is minimal in wood compared to tangential and radial, happens.
Longitudinal shrinkage affect a miter the same as it does a cope, but you can't fudge on a miter like you can a cope.
I'm not saying my way is the best or only way or even the right way, but inside coping was passed down from the old timers and they had "miters in their toolbox" so to speak. Just the way I have always preferred an inside corner.
 

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Am i the only one that does coping with an angle grinder with an extension and sanding disk? That whole coping with a jig saw thing looks a bit time consuming id say....
 

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Jon,
I use an older porter cable jig saw that has a very small opening for the blade and adjustable guides on each side. It is easy to support the base on the angle of the board you are coping. I can buzz through a piece of decorative 6" base in about twenty seconds. Then I just finish up with a rat tail file. Works very nice with a littl practice.
By the way, on 45 degree inside corners, I usually miter them and glue the joint, testing the angle before cutting with an angle finder.
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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Well I know it seems there are lots in here who like the old way of coping. LOL

But for anyone who prefers the miter cuts, you can check out the chart below. Really is helpful. Of course you may have to do some tweaks with the angles giving depending on how accurate your walls are that you are working with. However this chart will get you a great start & in alot of cases the right cut the first time....... ha ha ha


Enjoy!


Download the Crown Table below
 

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