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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I have a few questions about installing crown moldings. I've been reading lots of guides and seeings lot of vids, but there are so many methods I'm not sure the best way to go about it.

I have 5" 45 degree crowns

1. Studs
Do you really need to nail them to the studs? I can understand why but have seen videos of people not even bothering to look for the studs. They just measure, cut, and nail away

Do you have to find the studs in the ceiling, too?

2. Long wall cuts
I've seen straight cuts and angle cuts. Some claim the 45 degree cut gives a more seamless look when you have to join 2 long pieces of crowns in the middle of the room. Does it really matter since I'll be filling it up with caulk anyways?

3. How far from the edge of the molding should you nail through?

4. Glue
When is it recommended to use glue on the edges of the molding? I can't see why to bother since the nails will be doing all the hard work

Any additional tips will be greatly appreciated. Thanks! :smile:
 

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Sometimes there isn't wood in the ceiling to nail the crown to because you are going parallel to the joists but I would at least find the studs in the walls. Sheetrock doesn't hold a nail very well and if the wood warps it will pull away from the wall later. I would put a nail in as much wood as you can locate. The only places I will use some constuction on crown is when there isn't wood to nail to. When you install it mark a line on the wall for the bottom edge of the molding so it all goes up alike. If you just eyeball it chances are your mitered joints won't match up right.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ah yeah the backer! I had forgotten about that. Very good points. TY guys. Makes sense to use the backer in case I can't find wood in the ceiling. I def have wood in my walls, so backer it is, and I won't worry about glue.
 

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Old School
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Joining the ends of trim work out better scarfed (long angle). It allows for a more even alignment, and if sanding is needed it's over a longer area and less noticeable than if the joint was just butted.

I agree, a backer solves the problem. Notice also, in the below picture the adjustable support. They are a great help if you work alone. Sometimes better than a helper.
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j5juvn.jpg






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Every wall I have even installed crown on has a 2x4 cap. If you nail to this cap you do not have to find a stud.

George
 

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Tool Fanactic
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Fast cap makes crown clips, best 5 bucks a person can spend

The reason I Butt my base and crown is because I cope everything and I always cut a touch long and spring it into place. A butt makes this easy and cutting the trim like I do, acts like a clamp to put a bit of pressure on that glue joint. Makes it easy to do solo and a rock solid field joint.
 
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