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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am building a crosscut sled for my TS and have 2 questions:

1) What is a good width to accommodate? I am thinking it should at least allow material 24" wide to fit in it.

2) Some plans use a single miter slot and some use both miter slots. Any advantages to one over the other? It would be easier to use only one because you don't need to align two, but I'm thinking using both slots would be more stable.

Steve
 

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I'd want to be able to cut 24 minimum, so I'd set it up for 24.5 just to give some clearance...
 

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Wide is good

Two miters are better then one - but no need to align if you build it in 2 sections. There was an article in Fine Woodworking magazine and I'll try to find the article if you don't understand my simple explanation.

Place a miter bar in the right slot, place your sled table on it and secure it, but the half of the table should extend beyond the blade so you can cut off the excess and now your right half of the sled is perfectly aligned to the blade. Repeat the process for the left slot... join the 2 half sleds with the fence etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the suggestions.

I am building many cabinets for our kitchen out of prefinished 3/4" maple plywood. I plan on breaking down the sheets using my circular saw and a homemade edge-guide to slightly oversize. Then I will cut it accurately using the sled on the table saw. The widest parts will be the base cabinet sides at 22 3/4" wide. Actually, the 1/2" backs will be larger but I don't want to make the sled THAT big.


Steve
 

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The most basic crosscut sled

This is from another thread I posted but it was a simple way to get accurate 90 degree crosscuts. There is/was no binding of the two identical miter gauges in the slots and the whole assembly pushed easy enough so as not to bend a short 6" stainless ruler.

The idea is you don't need a platform/base just two runners attached to a suitable fence. The runners can be steel as in this case, aluminum, or hardwood.

One great feature of the sled is you have the kerf visible at all times to determine where your cut will be., no guesswork or trial cuts. Just line up on the good side of your mark and away you go.


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http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/crosscut-sled-jig-30811/
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks, everyone for the very useful suggestions.

I am going to make the sled today, hopefully.

The plan is to make it 48" long with a slight offset to the left so it will support material 30" to the left of the blade and 18" to the right.

The width will accommodate 24" wide material, so the sled opening will be about 25" to make sure. I don't want to make it real wide because then it would need an infeed support also.

I'm still up in the air about the base material. It might be 3/4" MDF that I have around because I'm not too concerned with weight. I do have 1/2" BB plywood but that is reserved for the cabinets.

There will be 2 runners that I can make out of either oak or hard maple, both of which I have in the shop. I would really prefer steel, but i don't have any and also the Craftsman miter slots are less than 0.750" wide which means sanding or milling the metal to fit. Buying runners means waiting for them to arrive. Right now I need to make the sled ASAP so i can start the project. Later on I might upgrade the runners if there is a problem.

I really like William Ng's 5-cut method for squaring the sled, so I plan to do it that way.

Steve
 

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If you build that sled 48" long and wide enough to cut 24" material out of 3/4" MDF you will not want to lift/mov it very oftern.. HEAVY!!!

George
 
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