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Exiled to Missouri
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Definitely nothing fancy, but I needed a new cross-cut sled today. And so I built a new sled with scraps I had around the shop.
I cut the glides from a piece of yellow pine and then glued and screwed a piece of 3/4” plywood to them. The back brace is mahogany, which I fastened with screws. I had a piece that was water stained and marred by the planer. The front brace is from a mystery wood, it smelled familiar when I cut it, but I was unable to place it. Again it was attached with screws. I used the five cut method to test the alignment, and it was perfect on the first shot. Finally, I add some blocks of 3/4” plywood were the blade exists the sled, which were attached with glues and screws.

The last thing I did was add a little finishing wax to the glides.
I couldn’t help but think, however: What style can I build this in? Luckily, expediency won out over all other considerations.


 

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(clever wood pun here)
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That's a very usable looking sled. I have seen some with a Lexan strip over the blade area from the front to back brace. I have mixed feelings about this, though. It would add some rigidity and perhaps some safety, but it could also get in the way of whatever is riding the sleigh.

Did you put any finish or wax on the runners?
 

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Exiled to Missouri
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245 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's a very usable looking sled. I have seen some with a Lexan strip over the blade area from the front to back brace. I have mixed feelings about this, though. It would add some rigidity and perhaps some safety, but it could also get in the way of whatever is riding the sleigh.

Did you put any finish or wax on the runners?
I saw some sleds with them, but the majority seem to be without them. Which probably means they get in the way more often than not, and with blocks and clamps I believe it is safe enough. And yes, I put minwax, finishing wax on the runners.
 

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Looks good, been thinking about making one of these after i'm done building my scraps cyclone. Especially after all the big cross cuts I had to pull from the back of the TS on my last project :p
 

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Wood Snob
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Tom King said:
I think a safety cover over the blade after the sled has gone over the blade is worth having on any of them. This from someone who has used a table saw for 41 years, and never used a splitter or anti-kickback device.
I've tried to use blade covers and have found if they aren't easy to use and don't always work well. They become their ownsafety problems with undue forces on the wood being cut. But maybe a cover on the exit side.

Sometimes the wood is case hardened in the drying process and pinches on the splitter requiring more force needed to push the wood through. Im just not comfortable with this. I like to make my cuts the same way every time and have developed habits that insure safe cuts unimpeded by how the guard is going to play into the situation.

Nails only hold themselves.
 
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