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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I am getting ready to make my first crosscut sled. I have an older no name import saw with an incra ls ts fence system on it.

The dimensions are 23" for the table front to back and 12" from the edge of the front of the table to the saw. My question is about the dimensions I can/should make the sled. I've watched several different youtube videos about making the sled and none seem to mention dimensions. I dont have miter tracks on my outfeed table because of the incra fence system.

Do I have limitations on how big I can make the sled? For example, must my sled be under 12" because thats the distance from the edge of the table to the blade or can part of the sled start out before the cut hanging over the table. And, on the other side of the table, can I slide past the edge of the table when finishing the cut or is that a problem? Thinking it might be because the miter tracks on the saw are recesed below the table and the outfeed table is pretty close to the height of the table saw currently.

Hopefully that makes sense. Was thinking I'd be best trying to build a sled that will accomodate as wide a board as possible so, wanted to check in. Have a pic below that will hopefully show my setup.

Thanks in advance.

 

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I,m not trying to be obnoxious but someone please explain the use of a TS sled to me , I use one fairly regularly but also have a sliding compound mitre saw. I use the sled for intermediate width material ( 14"/16") but have never had a problem putting wider material through the TS using the fence, am I missing something?.
P.S poster, as an x aero space machinist I find the photo hard to look at please take some wire wool and mineral oil and clean off that saw bed.
 

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*Ok, I'll take stab at this...

If I'm wrong on any of this I'm hoping someone will correct me.

deadherring said:
Hi,

I dont have miter tracks on my outfeed table because of the incra fence system.

***You don't need actual miter tracks in your outfeed table but a 1" wide x 3/8" deep dado should be routed in to accept the runners on your sled without binding.

Do I have limitations on how big I can make the sled? For example, must my sled be under 12" because thats the distance from the edge of the table to the blade or can part of the sled start out before the cut hanging over the table.

***the depth (front to back) dimension of your sled should be
+/- 30". This will allow you to cross cut a sizable panel.

*** the runners on the sled should extend well past the back of the sled to allow you to have the sled in a stable position before the blade enters the back of the sled.

And, on the other side of the table, can I slide past the edge of the table when finishing the cut or is that a problem?

***I wouldn't recommend sliding the sled off off the saw table.

***This would position your arms over the blade. Remember that the blade will exit the sled at the end of the cut. Install a guard on the front fence and possibly a temp stop on your outfeed table as an added safety measure.

***The width (side to side) of the sled should be substantial to allow you to crosscut longer pieces.

***The front fence should be high enough so that you can clamp stop blocks to it for accurate repetitive cuts.
***
 

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tonycan said:
I,m not trying to be obnoxious but someone please explain the use of a TS sled to me , I use one fairly regularly but also have a sliding compound mitre saw. I use the sled for intermediate width material ( 14"/16") but have never had a problem putting wider material through the TS using the fence, am I missing something?.
P.S poster, as an x aero space machinist I find the photo hard to look at please take some wire wool and mineral oil and clean off that saw bed.
Tony,

It's a safety thing.

Using your fence for crosscuts is dangerous. To do so is just asking for kickback.

Use a miter gauge or a panel sled.
 

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Jharris , sorry I should have said that I do use a sliding mitre with an extended arm fitted on it. My point is tat sometimes people use sleds because it is the thing to do and not out of necessity. You are right to point out the safety aspects though as I for one have had a board hit me ' you know where'
 

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tonycan said:
Jharris , sorry I should have said that I do use a sliding mitre with an extended arm fitted on it.

*No apology necessary Tony. I misunderstood your post and underestimated your level of experience. Sorry

My point is that sometimes people use sleds because it is the thing to do and not out of necessity.

*True, and sometimes it's the thing to do because of necessity.

*Case in point... the other day I was helping out in another shop and had to cut a batch of shelves to length.

*There was no RAS available. The table saw was a recent replacement and the panel sled for the old saw didn't fit.

*I had to attach a long aux fence to the miter gauge and clamp a stop block to it. Not ideal by my estimation but I got the job done.

*On a side note, I recently saw a similar thing done using a long fence attached to twin miter gauges eliminating the sled bed altogether.

*Velly interestink!

You are right to point out the safety aspects though as I for one have had a board hit me ' you know where'

Laughing! I thought your typing had a high note to it. ;)
....
 

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deadherring said:
If the sled is 30" and I have 12" between the blade and the front of the table w the whole table being 23"...how does that work?
I'm not sure I understand your question.

As you push the sled past the blade the blade travels through the sled.

As I understand it the distance from the from of the table to the front of the blade is irrelevant.

I might be wrong. As I said I'm open to being corrected.
 

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Thanks Danno,

What if any advantage's do you see in using this method over a traditional panel sled?

Disadvantages?

One advantage I can see is that it would be easier to store in a small shop.

The disadvantage I see is a that traditional panel sled would be much less expensive than buying two miter gauges.
 

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there are 2 ways to make a "sled"

The first way I tried used 2 miter guages and a long fence that joined them. There was some discussion as to the rigidity, so I added a stiffening brace:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/crosscut-sled-jig-30811/

the second way is more traditional and uses a large panel and runners:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/ts-sled-need-one-not-32633/

and this:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/thanks-inspiration-woodnthings-50693/


my sled build:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/table-saw-sled-build-49218/

The crosscut capacity of each varies with the length of the miter guage bars in the first case and the distance from the front of the exposed blade to the front fence in the panel version.
The distance from the front of the blade to the front of the table is more of a convenience in supporting the sled than a limiting factor in the width.

As far as my own process, I just use the standard fence when cross cutting large panels square. Obviously the panels must be square to start with and I'm just cutting them to size. The sled will assure a square corner for all crosscuts. :yes:

If you happen top have 2 identical miter guages, that's the quickest and easiest way to make one.
 
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Thanks Danno,

What if any advantage's do you see in using this method over a traditional panel sled?

Disadvantages?

One advantage I can see is that it would be easier to store in a small shop.

The disadvantage I see is a that traditional panel sled would be much less expensive than buying two miter gauges.
Really the only advantage in my mind would be gaining the thickness of material used for the sled. Other than that, I don't see anything else to say one method is better than the other.

I actually only did it at work because I had two gauges available and not enough time to make a sled.

I agree about the traditional sled being less expensive. Plus, they're more fun to build! In my home shop, I'd go traditional.

Edit: now that I think of it...being able to jig something on a sled is also a plus. Something you can't do if there's no base.
 

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Using two slots and twin gauges sounds interesting, providing the gauges can be made solid enough to run parallel, has. Any one else tried this?
\

fabricating a CC sled would probably result in more acuratet cuts, provided it's fabricated correctly. according to "Nahm", CC sleds (or panel cutting sleds) are principally used for squaring up panels used in casework and furniture fabrication. i have two and i wouldn't try to CC a 24" cabinet panel without them.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I'm not sure I understand your question.

As you push the sled past the blade the blade travels through the sled.

As I understand it the distance from the from of the table to the front of the blade is irrelevant.

I might be wrong. As I said I'm open to being corrected.
Right, I meant that with the sled being bigger than the table, the sled will start (and end) the cut at least partially off the table. I was verifying that that was ok.
 

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Dang it!

The thank option on my phone app just disappeared! What's with that?

I built a tiny sled recently out of necessity and a large sled is on my to do list.

You filled in the gaps in my limited sled knowledge quite nicely.

I'm now able to approach the project with confidence.

Thank you all for your input.
 
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