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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello folks, Im a new member, and new to woodworking. Ive built things when I was younger like skateboard and snowboard ramps of large size. Now in my older age I would like to start doing woodwork for around the house.

My first project is going to be a coffee table. I want it to be a rustic style using 1X6's as the sides and top. I have a pretty good idea of how im going to succeed in building the table, but I need some help for my top. I would like to use the 1x6 on top as well but would like to inlay glass on the top.

The idea is to leave a wood barrier around the glass to the edge of the table of probably 3" on all 4 sides. Now I need to figure out a way to get the wood cut out for the glass to have the glass lay flush with the border. Now in doing some research I've come to the conclusion that im either going to router it, or try my hand at a chisel. So most likely a router since its my first project of this style.

So now my question is would there be a way to do this that im missing? If the router is the option would I use a plunge router? And any recommendations on bits? I know that good wood working isnt rushed, but from way I can gather I would be taking out row by row by row with the router. With this would that mean I would be best to move the guide for every cut?

Thank you for any help or tips while I plan this out.
 

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The way I would do it is with my router sled, I made one similar to one Marc @the wood whisperer did and used it to level my workbench top. You could use this the same way with stops on each side to control your area. I used an Amana 1" straight bit (I think) and the plunge router. To get precise lines you could route with a smaller straight bit to outline the area you want to set the glass in and then route out the middle with a bigger bit. You have to have the sled so that your router has an even area to set depth from. Then a chisel to make your corners and your done.

Good luck and let us know how it turns out!
 

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And welcome to the forum! Make sure you go to the introductions section and let us know a little more about you.
 

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Do you want to inlay the glass or be able to see the floor below?

To see the floor, rout the perimeter and jig saw the waste in the middle.

To inlay, rout grooves 1/2" apart (yes, you have to move the guide rail.)
Bash out the ribs and go down again to the needed depth. If it's just 1/4"
plate (new or salvage), you should be able to make the depth in one pass.

This is pretty much how I carve down dish voids to 3" deep. Forstner bits for the rough,
bash out the webbing and go again. The crush ahead of a 1" Forstner is about 1/4" beyond
what you see in the wood. Plan for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I want to inlay it. I want to see the wood not the floor. What does "bash out" mean? Is that literal? I'm knocking out the ribs with a hammer and chisel? Or is that a router term?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Does it make sense to set up a rail around the space I want to cut out then plunge cut the boarder, then switch to a fixed base and just keep moving the guide and keep knocking rows out?

How large of a bit is there? As in how big of a channel will it cut? And will larger bits make rougher cuts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yea I've considered it, but I just think it'll look like I took a short cut. People may not notice/think that, but when I decided I wanted to do it that's how I want it to look so I feel like I'll be admitting defeat.

Plus my lady recommended that and I already said "oh no no I'll be able to figure it out" so now I have to otherwise I'll get to hear about it
 
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