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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
First, I know I'm discussing the use of a power tool in a way it wasn't designed for... I'm not suggesting or recommending that anyone try it. So, with all potential safety/liability/doomsday issues set aside for a moment, here's my hypothetical question:

I've got a 6 inch jointer. If I remove the blade guard and move the fence back, wouldn't I conceivably be able to surface-joint a board wider than six inches (up to 12 inches, in this case) by simply making two passes? The first pass surfaces half the width, then simply turn the board around and run the other half.

It occurred to me that half the board's surface would be cut against the grain, but I'm thinking that using very shallow cuts and going slow would minimize any tear-out.

Got the idea last night while I was making sawdust...and it's been rattling around in my head all morning. I'm trying my best to think of a reason why this wouldn't work, but I'm coming up empty.

Any thoughts?
 

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Cabinetmaker
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BB; I shure wood knot do it, i like my fingers where they are, Secondly' you have no reference for the second cut:no: after the first pass that face is now NOT on the jointer therefore next pass is NOT registered off the first
 

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First, I know I'm discussing the use of a power tool in a way it wasn't designed for... I'm not suggesting or recommending that anyone try it. So, with all potential safety/liability/doomsday issues set aside for a moment, here's my hypothetical question:

I've got a 6 inch jointer. If I remove the blade guard and move the fence back, wouldn't I conceivably be able to surface-joint a board wider than six inches (up to 12 inches, in this case) by simply making two passes? The first pass surfaces half the width, then simply turn the board around and run the other half.

It occurred to me that half the board's surface would be cut against the grain, but I'm thinking that using very shallow cuts and going slow would minimize any tear-out.

Got the idea last night while I was making sawdust...and it's been rattling around in my head all morning. I'm trying my best to think of a reason why this wouldn't work, but I'm coming up empty.

Any thoughts?

YES!

DO IT ONLY if you have real GUTS, some spare fingers that you don't need, the money to spend on medical bills, and have the time to spare while you are healing!

In other words...

NO...

(1/2 of your cutting is against the grain... does that tell you anything?)
 

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I've heard of people doing this but I was never inclined to try it. Not that the obvious safety issues concern me too much, but I just can't see it working out very well in term of results.

A sled on the planer is, in my opinion, a much better way to accomplish "jointing" boards wider than your jointer.
 

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Old School
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I've heard of people doing this but I was never inclined to try it. Not that the obvious safety issues concern me too much, but I just can't see it working out very well in term of results.

A sled on the planer is, in my opinion, a much better way to accomplish "jointing" boards wider than your jointer.

It's not a concern because you aren't envisioning what the damage will be. Lets see, set the cut for only a 1/16" and see how nice your palm comes out.

As for setup, it was mentioned that only half of your stock is bedded and you are jointing the wrong way. As for planing, the same holds true. If it is that critical, run stock that fits the tool, and then glue up.

Some of the BEWARES
1. I heard someone say...
2. I saw someone do it this way...
3. I read somewhere that...
 

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Cabinetman:

It's not a concern because you aren't envisioning what the damage will be.
Actually, no....

Now I don't want to appear unnessarily obtuse or combative, but it doesn't concern me because I just DON'T DO stupid stuff like getting my hands/fingers anywhere near a flailing cutting implement. I do this for a living and injuries mean I don't make money - so I'm well motivated to use safe practices.

I was wondering if someone would jump on that....
 

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I'm not understanding how you would hurt yourself. If you're cautious of the blades as you would be using any woodworking tool how would you get injured? If I miscalculated or messed up a small board the last thing I want to do is drag out the planer. I'll plane the boards on the jointer taking small amounts off at a time. Use a push stick at the end and I can't see how your palm would touch the blades.
 

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No sir I sure would not...I might consider planeing a 6 inch board on the jointer then glueing it together with another so planed...if you really need a planer I have a DeWalt unused collecting dust...email me and make a reasonable offer...
 

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Just for me, could someone explain the differences between a jointer and a planer. Both seem to have oversized routers on their sides in a table.
johnep
 

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Great analogy !!!

Just for me, could someone explain the differences between a jointer and a planer. Both seem to have oversized routers on their sides in a table.
johnep
Jointers are used to flatten a surface or edge and then bring two of the adjoining surfaces into (normally) 90 degrees of each other. Once you have established these two reference syrfaces you can then size to width on the table saw or to thickness on the thickness planer.

The thickness planer does not flatten very well if it does not have a good reference surface to start with. If you haven't prepared a flat face the best it will do is even out some of the high spots so that you will wind up with a board that is mostly the thickness you want from end to end but it will not be flat.

Ed
 

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My bro-in-law has been woodworking for lots and lots of years. Built 3 houses, lots of cabinets, a pool table just to name a few of his projects. All with no mishaps or injuries until...he got careless with a 6 inch jointer. Now one of the fingers on his left hand is one joint (no pun intended) shorter than it should be. I have a permanent scar on my stomach shaped like the end grain of a 1x6 from table saw kickback. Please be very careful and use any tools the way they are designed to be used!!
 

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Ditto. Being a musician and a woodworker is enough incentive for me to be careful. I kinda like my digits right where they are.
 

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First, I know I'm discussing the use of a power tool in a way it wasn't designed for... I'm not suggesting or recommending that anyone try it. So, with all potential safety/liability/doomsday issues set aside for a moment, here's my hypothetical question:

I've got a 6 inch jointer. If I remove the blade guard and move the fence back, wouldn't I conceivably be able to surface-joint a board wider than six inches (up to 12 inches, in this case) by simply making two passes? The first pass surfaces half the width, then simply turn the board around and run the other half.

It occurred to me that half the board's surface would be cut against the grain, but I'm thinking that using very shallow cuts and going slow would minimize any tear-out.

Got the idea last night while I was making sawdust...and it's been rattling around in my head all morning. I'm trying my best to think of a reason why this wouldn't work, but I'm coming up empty.

Any thoughts?
I tried this once and it kind of worked. The board had an irregularity in the middle after the double passes, and I fixed that by running the thing through my thickness planer. Consequently, you need to make sure that you have enough wood thickness to deal with the possible need to grind off a fair amount of wood to get things right.

Working with the blade guard removed kind of creeped me out, and although I had no problems I think that next time I would just use the thickness planer on a piece of wood that was not irregular enough to need jointing work.

Howard Ferstler
 

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about jointer

To start off i would not even try this 1 it is to dangerous and two you will not have a even flat surface . i do not see this working very well. What i would do is cut the wood down so it fits on the jointer. There is no short cut to doing a job right i would rather take my time and do it right. Like they say mesure twice cut once.
 
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