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I just retired, and am ready to build a shop, and I have a very old craftsman radial arm saw. I may, or may not use this in my shop. Since it is so old, I may look at a sliding compound saw. I used this saw quite a bit when I remodeled my basement, and back than, I really loved it. I noticed that there was a recall for the blade guard, and another company was sending out new guards. They are asking for a serial number. My saw sits on a stand that has cabinet doors, and I cannot find the serial number. Can anyone help me locate the serial number for my ancient Craftsman 10" radial arm saw.

Thank you.
 

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I also have an old Craftsman RAS from the late 60s. I never did respond to the recall and have continued to use the saw in it's original condition. When I built my small shop, like you, I considered dumping the RAS and buying a slider. I finally decided that the RAS will do what the slider does plus it has some additional "tricks" that the slider doesn't have. So, I put it against one wall with work tables on each side and use it mainly for breaking down longer lumber. I'm glad I kept it.
 

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I also have an old Craftsman RAS from the late 60s. I never did respond to the recall and have continued to use the saw in it's original condition. When I built my small shop, like you, I considered dumping the RAS and buying a slider. I finally decided that the RAS will do what the slider does plus it has some additional "tricks" that the slider doesn't have. So, I put it against one wall with work tables on each side and use it mainly for breaking down longer lumber. I'm glad I kept it.
Thank you so much for getting back to me. I really liked that saw when I was working with it years ago. I have not used it for years, and I know I was having issues with it not starting. Doing some research, they talking about it may be an issue with the red reset button, or the capacitator. It just will not start, no humming, or anything. I am hoping I can find a fix. Thanks again Yomanbill.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I just retired, and am ready to build a shop, and I have a very old craftsman radial arm saw. I may, or may not use this in my shop. Since it is so old, I may look at a sliding compound saw. I used this saw quite a bit when I remodeled my basement, and back than, I really loved it. I noticed that there was a recall for the blade guard, and another company was sending out new guards. They are asking for a serial number. My saw sits on a stand that has cabinet doors, and I cannot find the serial number. Can anyone help me locate the serial number for my ancient Craftsman 10" radial arm saw.

Thank you.
The model and serial numbers are typically on a 1" X 2" plate that'ss recessed into a stamped depression either on the left side of the base or on the rear. It won't be on the cabinet or stand. It won't be on the carriage or the motor, those are part numbers. Take another look. The model number may start with 103... or 113... like that. On my two 10" RAS with 113 ... saws they were on the front.
 

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I am a big fan of the Radial Arm Saw. Wouldn't want to be without one. But... not a big fan of Craftsman RAS. They tend to wear quickly and loose accuracy. Many, not all can't be adjusted or repaired. Parts no longer available.

I would check your closely. Look for play in the arm. Both of the ones I had would literally not cut a straight line. You couldn't index them to do an angle cut and then come back to 90 without a lot of measuring to realign it.

I finally gave my two away and took a year but I found an old cast iron dewalt and have been extremly pleased with mine. Does everything like it should.

My suggestion is check it out carefully before you decide. You may have a good one but if it worn you may want to take the rebate.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I am a big fan of the Radial Arm Saw. Wouldn't want to be without one. But... not a big fan of Craftsman RAS. They tend to wear quickly and loose accuracy. Many, not all can't be adjusted or repaired. Parts no longer available.

I would check your closely. Look for play in the arm. Both of the ones I had would literally not cut a straight line. You couldn't index them to do an angle cut and then come back to 90 without a lot of measuring to realign it.

I finally gave my two away and took a year but I found an old cast iron dewalt and have been extremly pleased with mine. Does everything like it should.

My suggestion is check it out carefully before you decide. You may have a good one but if it worn you may want to take the rebate.
Thank you Jeff, I appreciate the feedback.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
My serial number is on a plate riveted to the side of the metal base (below the table)
I found the plate on the back side of my saw. After further reading, Emerson must have some stake in the Radial arm saw. At one time, they were providing a new blade guard. Now, they want you to physically cut the cord to permanently disable the saw, and they will send you $50.00. This I am sure is so they have no liability, should one injure themselves. So, I am not going to do that, unless I cannot get the saw to run. Thanks again for your feed back.
 

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Emerson built them for Craftsman.

I believe any Craftsman tool that has a part number that starts with 113. was built by Emerson.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I am a big fan of the Radial Arm Saw. Wouldn't want to be without one. But... not a big fan of Craftsman RAS. They tend to wear quickly and loose accuracy. Many, not all can't be adjusted or repaired. Parts no longer available.

I would check your closely. Look for play in the arm. Both of the ones I had would literally not cut a straight line. You couldn't index them to do an angle cut and then come back to 90 without a lot of measuring to realign it.

I finally gave my two away and took a year but I found an old cast iron dewalt and have been extremly pleased with mine. Does everything like it should.

My suggestion is check it out carefully before you decide. You may have a good one but if it worn you may want to take the rebate.
Nothing to waer out, actually. The rails are hardened steel and the "V" groove bearings on the carriage don't really wear out, and can be snugged up by rotating the cam shaped bolts that secure them. The earliest ones have "cast in " rails so stay away from those.
 

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I haveone of these that was my dad's and about 8 years ago we took the not-working motor to a motor repair shop and I think we only paid $40 to get it running again. I used it quite a bit until my husband passed and I had to move out, putting it in storage. Two years later I found out that the roof of the storage garage had caved in and most of the tools stored there were "destroyed" (Long story as to how that could have happened) and the only things I salvaged were the RAS, compound miter saw, and a Foley-Belsaw planer (220 elec, I can't use it). The planer is at my brothers where it may work again someday, the RAS is in another cold storage place--I hope I can get it to my new shop and it runs, and the compound miter saw works just fine! It was horrible to lose all my dad's stuff, but the memories remain.
 

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Nothing to waer out, actually. The rails are hardened steel and the "V" groove bearings on the carriage don't really wear out, and can be snugged up by rotating the cam shaped bolts that secure them. The earliest ones have "cast in " rails so stay away from those.
No, not the Craftsman I had. The two I had were formed sheet metal rails. Nylon covered bearings. No hardened rails in those. No adjustments either on one of them.

The early 'Model 100' may be built like that. But latter on they were value engineered and no where near as well made as you describe.
 

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where's my table saw?
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No, not the Craftsman I had. The two I had were formed sheet metal rails. Nylon covered bearings. No hardened rails in those. No adjustments either on one of them.

The early 'Model 100' may be built like that. But latter on they were value engineered and no where near as well made as you describe.
I have 3 - 12" RAS and 4 - 10" RAS, all Craftsman. The 10" - Model 100 I inherited has the cast in rails. All the rest have hardened steel rails the are removable. I've never seen stamped steel rail, even posted on here. Never seen Nylon bearings either, but that doesn't mean they didn't make some that way. Mine are all older from the 1990's and well built. I have parted a few out and some are just taking up space on a long bench, but I do use one 12" all the time and one 10" for dados. Just be aware of the pitfalls of the "built for value" ones and avoid those.
 
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