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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

I have a 36" wide table made from 6" planks. The last plank had quite a few cracks and so we filled it. Its been 6 weeks and now the fillings and depressions are starting to show as shown. Please how can I fix this? Thanks

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You need to supply a bit more information , so that the folks here can assist you .
What timber is the table made from .
What did you use to fill the cracks .
What did you apply as a finish .
 

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You need to supply a bit more information , so that the folks here can assist you .
What timber is the table made from .
What did you use to fill the cracks .
What did you apply as a finish .
+1.:laughing: What else would help is a better picture of the top, and exactly where the crack is. IOW, is it on a joint, or within a board.






.
 

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It's best when you are building anything with a large plank of wood such as a table top that you don't use any wood with existing cracks. The cracks though are not difficult to fix but they will return again and again. I would probably fill the crack with some soft putty and wipe the excess off with old english scratch cover for dark wood. This is something that is simple and you can do it again and again. You can also put masking tape on each side of the crack and take an eyedroper and run a bead of the finish you used over the crack and let dry. Put as narrow of a bead as you can trying to get the bead between the tape instead of over it. Depending on the crack it may take more than one application to fill the void. Once filled you can sand flat with 220 sandpaper with a block of wood down to the tape and then remove the tape and sand flush with the top and continue to sand the entire top. Then put a fresh coat of finish over the entire top of the table.
 

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Did you look at the pictures before posting? The first is bad, the second is so dark to be useless.

As others have said, the cracks will change as the wood moves.

Does the first picture show white filler? Hard to see.

Is the crack in the middle of the board? Also hard to see.

You can mix stain with filler, e.g., TimberMate, but as Steve Neul says, it will be temporary.

The wood moves, the filler does not.

The best fix is to remove the cracked board and replace with a better board.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
sorry about the pics. they were sent by the client. yes the crack is in the middle of the board. Its been filled with sawdust mixture then wax. I cant replace the board because the whole table will be affected.
 

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sorry about the pics. they were sent by the client. yes the crack is in the middle of the board. Its been filled with sawdust mixture then wax. I cant replace the board because the whole table will be affected.
Wow, wax as a filler! Sorry to have to advise but you did not make a good decision. It would have been better to not fill.

The wax/sawdust should be removed before you attempt any fix since I will prevent other items from adhering. Likely this would need to be done by a solvent, and the solvent may affect the finish.

Woodturners fill small cracks with CA glue (aka super glue). Woodturners fill wider cracks with 2 part epoxy. Neither will adhere to wax so will pop out.

Even if you now wanted to try a real wood filler like TimberMate, it will not adhere to the wax and would pop out.

http://www.woodcraft.com/search2/search.aspx?query=timbermate wood filler

You are going to need to retrieve the table from the client in order to do any attempt at repair.
 

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To view the full extent of the damage , the top needs to be sanded . The underside also needs looking at .

Wax and sawdust ....... what next
 

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Wax and sawdust isn't that unusual. Some of these fill sticks to fill a nail hole in paneling are wax and pigment.

Another method of touching up the spot is a technique called a burn in. The fill is a shellac stick that is very hard though and would shatter when the wood shrinks again. If you are interested I will elaborate.
 

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Turning Wood Into Art
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get a piece of MDF the length of your board. Cut it to the shape of the crack and with a nice flow to each end of the board. Clamp the MDF to your board as a 'straight edge' (though not really straight, more of a guide)

With it set the right distance for a router to run along the board to cut out the crack. You can use a 1/4" router bit and take a strip out the entire length. It will be parallel and you can just glue it back together.

your top will be reduced by 1/4" or by whatever size bit you use but the board should not crack again, at least not on the same spot anyway
 

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Wax and sawdust isn't that unusual. Some of these fill sticks to fill a nail hole in paneling are wax and pigment.

Another method of touching up the spot is a technique called a burn in. The fill is a shellac stick that is very hard though and would shatter when the wood shrinks again. If you are interested I will elaborate.


A crack is not a pin hole , nor is it a 'spot',
and a table top is not paneling .
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you all for the suggestions. As I said ripping out the board is off limits.
Background of this table:

Client wanted a dining table so I suggested we go with a 36-39" wide one. He told me his "interior designer" gad told him 33" wide to be correct despite my telling him that would be too narrow for his needs. Anyway I made it 33" as per his wishes. We used some old reclaimed burma teakwood without a single crack. I had made a 3" thick border around the planks to give it a thick look. then! he was upset with it and asked me to make it 36" as orginally suggested by me! so we totally ripped it open and added another teak plank. it was slightly darker and had more cracks and it was obviously from a different batch. And then we filled that crack with the putty and sawdust and sprayed it with a PU finish. I think the white residue is the PU. I am hoping the timbermate solution will work-mainly because this teak is already seasoned and hardly ever warps even in the humidity of Mumbai( thats why its the preffered wood here). thanks. ! heres a pic of part of it.

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my method may be too late to use for this job but one worth keeping in mind for future jobs
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
have finally decided the only thing left to do is sand the table down and glue down 6mm planks on the table....dont think will go down the timbermate route.
 
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