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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello I'm new here and a amateur woodworker at best. I have a big wooden gate that was made a few years ago. I am sanding it down to re-stain. It has some pretty big cracks in it. It also looks like it is separating where the boards were glued together. Looks to be tongue and groove. Any recommendations and what to do and what to use to fill in the cracks?
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you use caulk wouldn't you see it? My wife likes the stained look but it didn't last long being out in the weather. Your saying wood oil would be better?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Caulk comes in many colors at Home Depot, I've used DAP brand for years.
The SW stain I recommended will last 5 to 10 years with outside all season exposure.
Oil stain will be limited in colors, at least as far as I know. I used Penofin Cedar on my deck 2 or 3 years ago and now it needs another power wash and stain:
Excellent. Thank you for all your help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I think it is important to use a flexible caulk in the crack to keep the moisture out of the interior laminations as much as possible.
Yea I think that is the way I'm going to go. I found some caulk called exact color which is made to be mixed with the stain to get a good color match. I thank you for all yalls help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
There are some "cracks" and there are some "seams" where the boards were splined together.... as I see it.
The cracks are a natural phenomenon, just like the seams, which are man made and both are a result of the wood expanding.
Water must be kept out of the cracks, especially if in freezing conditions which will open them further.
It is a great looking gate! The cap strip on the top edge sets it off nicely and keeps the water out of the ends.
A Cathedral Arch which you don't often see on a gate.
There have been the following recommendations:
Do Nothing.
Sand it only.
Sand it, stain it and caulk the cracks and seams. (my advice)
Keep epoxy coating it until it will absorb no more.

There are so many opinions, it may be confusing to the OP.
To follow up on my advice, use Woodscapes, a water based solid color stain like I posted by Sherman Williams because any residual water in the cracks will work with the stain and dry out eventually, and not be captured under an oil film surface. Most caulks are water based these days, I use a DAP product just today in a great shade of dark brown.
They also list Transparent colors if you want the grain to show, but I have no first hand experience with those.

Yep. It has been sanded, caulked, and stained. Will post pics when it's completely finished.
 
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