Woodworking Talk banner
21 - 37 of 37 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,419 Posts
I don't doubt the Festool is good, but is the extra cost worth it for me
Whenever that question is asked, the answer is usually no. I like festool, I think that they make quality tools, but drills are simple and I seriously doubt that festool has some magic mojo that makes it that much better than the DeWalt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
438 Posts
Welcome to the forum.

That's a wide question, I'll focus on something that's confusing to me.
A drill driver, when in driver mode you can put in or remove small to medium size screws, you set how much torque it stops at.

An impact driver is for screws in tougher situations, instead of a smooth turn it jerks, as if you are trying to remove a stuck bolt and hit the end of the wrench with a hammer. To your hand it still feels fairly smooth. Popular for things like screwing down the boards of an outdoor deck. I rarely use one for wood working, most of the time a drill-driver is perfect for me.

https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DCD709B-Brushless-Compact-Cordless/dp/B07VCC8R8C A hammer drill is for drilling concrete, stone etc. As it turns it as if you hitting the end of a drill bit with a hammer, to break the material at the bit point.

https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-Cordless-Impact-Wrench-DCF894B/dp/B078WDTV2F An impact wrench is for machines, nuts and bolts.

I like DeWalt for hobby use, it is good for the price, I don't need the toughest, most professional tool on the planet. https://www.amazon.com/Festool-574700-Cordless-Drill/dp/B06XPB6JL1 I don't doubt the Festool is good, but is the extra cost worth it for me?
Adding to the excellent info above...

Drill batteries can limit the power a drill has. 12V is generally less powerful than 18/20V, and those are less powerful than the 36/54/60V options that are available. The 60V batteries are about on par with corded models for drills and circular saws, and some drills / saws can take the 20V or 60V power. Dewalt calls these 'flexvolt'.

Hammer drills are varied. The better ones have SDS style drill bits, and they are a ton more capable for drilling into masonry than your typical dewalt cordless hammer drill. If you frequently drill even small holes into concrete, the corded sds hammer drill is recommended
 

·
Registered
Termite
Joined
·
5,366 Posts
I went by home depot to Dat to get a couple light switches. While there I took a look just to see if the 12v XRP batteries were still available. I didn't see any. So that replacement option may be slipping away. Because I don't install anymore I may just buy the small milwaukee and use them...
Product Pneumatic tool Camera accessory Tool Handheld power drill
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
29,625 Posts
OK, I lied, but it wasn't on purpose!
I do have a Harbor Freight battery powered screw driver which I had forgotten about. If you do any sort of electrical work or anything that involves very small screws in tight places, a powerful drill driver won't work. It's too big, too powerful and won't fit in cramped quarters. I picked up a Bauer 1/4" hex drive screw driver a while back and indeed, it's just the tool for those small screws on electrical boxes nd outlet terminals. A final twist of a hand held driver makes certain there's a good electrical connection.

The newer outlets are coming with "hybrid" screws that take flat, Phillips and square drive bits. Square drive is the only way to go!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
I'm currently using the Rigid brand drill and 1/4" impact. Pretty happy so far. Purchased because of the lifetime warranty for the tools and the batteries. To me it's a no brainer for the homeowner.
I've also had the Crafsman 19.2 Volt and a Dewalt 18 Volt drill. Was real disappointed by the Dewalt.

Ken
 

·
That Guy
Joined
·
483 Posts
I've got two Craftsman Drills. A 9.6 volt and a 12V. Both are ancient, maybe 20 years old?

They both use NiCad batteries and I love them. I can buy sub-c NiCad batteries on EBay for $2 each and rebuild my battery packs for less than $20. It's true they don't last as long but when they are this cheap and easy to maintain why buy something you can't repair yourself? I've probably rebuilt each battery pack 5 times over the last 20 years.

I've got two battery packs for each drill and the charger usually recharges one before the other goes dead.

All of my other tools either plug into the wall or to my air compressor.
 

·
Registered
Termite
Joined
·
5,366 Posts
As much as I've been using them in the shop I may not invest in anymore cordless. All I've been using them for here lately is housd maintenance. I really want a Makita, but it may be a waste...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,571 Posts
For cordless, I have 18v Li-Ion Makita drills/impact drivers, two of each, white and blue. I think one of the drills has the hammer function too. For most everything else I prefer corded.

Last year when I submitted my tablesaw drawer/tray combination to woodworker's Journal, I won a Milwaukee 18v narrow crown stapler. It drives these monster staples. Not having to deal with the compressor and hose basically offsets the heavier weight for typical quick homeowner tasks. For framing, trimming, etc, I would still prefer the lighter weight of the air- nailer.

I would also consider one of those little cordless circular saws for breaking down plywood into manageable pieces directly off the pickup truck.
 

·
Registered
Termite
Joined
·
5,366 Posts
When I installed cabinets cordless made a lot of sense. If your in the shop full time cordless drill is a preference, but is used around the house. Everything else is just a want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,863 Posts
The cordless tools I use the most are the drill/drivers and the circular saw. A close second (third?) would be the reciprocating saw (sawzall).

I have not owned a corded circular saw in decades. Despite its 5-1/2 inch blade size, that cordless circular saw has been a workhorse for me.

I use the reciprocating saw mostly in the yard for cutting larger limbs, etc. Sure, I do demolition, cut pipe and rods, etc. with it, but the bulk of its use is in the yard. Cordless helps there, too.

I keep trying to find a good use for the impact driver where the drill/drivers are not better. No luck yet.
 

·
Wannabe
Joined
·
27 Posts
I have 100% Ryobi which I've had ZERO problems with for going on 4 years now, and I have a LOT of them.
Automotive tire Yellow Motor vehicle Tire Automotive design


Green Yellow Tool Sportswear Strap


Motor vehicle Automotive tire Tire Tool Auto part


Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive design Yellow Automotive exterior


Automotive design Motor vehicle Personal protective equipment Sportswear Automotive tire


Green Yellow Shelving Shelf Retail


I'm actually looking at replacing the entire setup mainly due to battery weight
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
29,625 Posts
yes but I just ordered it a couple of days ago.. it's the crown stapler. :)
o_O
Anybody who likes Jack Daniels and Harley Davidson is OK in my book. The Ryobi addiction is a different story, but since it's a "disease" you can get help. I also have a tool addiction and 4 Harleys, down from 5. I feel your pain ...... just sayin'
 
Joined
·
33 Posts
A cordless drill, for example, is always trumped by a corded drill when speed is a must, like pocket holes. Too, my corded tools start every time, EXCEPT when I'm on site, when the corded tools are a must, when power isn't available.

That aside, the most used tools of my shop would be the cordless drill and impact.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
891 Posts
I have craftsman, ridgid, makita, and dewalt cordless tools. I started using a cordless drill way back when makita came out with their 9 volt cordless drill. The one with the really long battery. I use a cordless drill most followed by an impact driver.

Years ago I bought a craftsman battery powered circular saw, 18 volt I think, to break down sheet goods. It sucked and I went back to using a corded circular saw for breaking down sheet goods. I own and use mostly dewalt 20v tools so my son bought me a dewalt 20v, 6 1/4” circular saw. I thought it was another piece of junk battery powered circular saw based on my experience with the craftsman saw. To my surprise the dewalt saw works quite well for breaking down sheet goods and I no longer drag out the worm drive for that task.
 
21 - 37 of 37 Posts
Top