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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious…

What cordless tools do you use in your home shop/yard? I’m not interested in a debate over which is “better” (there are plenty of YouTube videos about that subject) , i just would like to see what is actually getting used day to day.

Among my tools I have:

Dewalt 18-v
½” drill
Circular saw

Black & Decker
3/8” drill
Weed trimmer

Ryobi
½” drill
Impact driver
Orbital sander
Leaf blower
Chainsaw
 

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Termite
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There are different levels of users with cordless tools.
 

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I am one of those people who prefers the same battery type and charger for cordless tools. I have had the same Craftsman set for a long time. They originally started with NiCd batteries, but Craftsman came out with compatible lithium batteries and charger for those C3 (19.2v) cordless tools. Otherwise, I would have replaced them with something else.

My Craftsman set came with a drill/driver, circular saw, reciprocating saw, stapler/nailer, and a fluorescent tube trouble light, plus the original NiCd-only charger.

I have seen many other shops with a dozen different brands of chargers and batteries all scattered around the shelf (shelves) and would prefer a single charger with a common set of tools.

I would never go back to NiCd batteries again. They don't last very long. I prefer lithium batteries, which hold their charge, run longer, and last much longer before they die.

By the way, I do not recommend Craftsman tools. The Craftsman brand name is no longer what it used to be. My points are:
-> Life is easier with one interchangeable form factor for batteries and charger.
-> Choose tools that take lithium batteries.

The only other cordless tool we have is my spouse's handheld hedge trimmer, with its own charger "brick" and a built-in, soldered-in, non-removable, NiCd battery. This is the second model of that tool that we have bought. The first one failed quickly. We bought both over my strong objections, but my spouse really wanted it. I predict that the second will fail quickly, too.

The opinions above are my own. Others here may differ, and I respect their points of view.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I started with Black and Decker (Kmart) 7.2 volts, then Makita 9.6 volts, then Dewalt 18 volts. Stayed with them for 30+ years and still run them.
Then when the Dewalt batteries started dying off, I got into Milwaukee 18 volt L-I because they also had mechanic's impact drivers, 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2" and my son also had Milwaukees. I have more Milwaukees now than any other brand and more different specific tools. They are great!
I also got some L-I Rigids, a circ saw, impact drivers and drills because of the battery warranty. I rarely use them but they are also great.
My newer 10.4 volt small, compact Makitas are great for inside cabinet work installing drawer track.
I have no Craftsman, no Harbor Freight, no Ryobi or other brands.
I have two shops, one is strictly for woodworking, the other involves metal work and mechanic's tools. The wood shop is on the second floor over the metal/mechanical, so mostly Milwaukee stuff up there, but about 1/3 of the Milwaukee tools especially the impact drivers are also downstairs.
According to You Tube, Dewalt has made huge improvements to their battery tool line up, but I have no first hand experience with the upgraded stuff.
 
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I use cordless drills and drivers for their convenience. I use corded tools when I want more power (or when a battery has a low charge). I have 18V tools in the garage and 12V tools in the house (two different manufacturers); I prefer the 12V tools because they are smaller and lighter.
 

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I stopped buying cordless other than drills because of failures...I have 12v dewalt drills that I bought new batteries for $60 each. Because power is off and on in the garage I'm starting to question there longevity....
 

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3/8 VSR hammer
impact driver (my "go to" with variety of bits)
multi-tool
sawzall
circular saw

All makita, same batteries.
 

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I've gone the dewalt route with their lithium "20V" and "flexvolt 60V" tools

Drill
Hammer drill
Driver
Omt
Sawzall
Angle grinder
Circ saw
Dust vac

The Dust vac isn't very powerful and I wish it was better, but it is incredibly handy.

I'm not a huge dewalt fan either, but these do the job, and like was said, the battery system tends to lock you in. The prices are very reasonable IMO

I went with Ego for my lawn tools because those batteries are great for holding a ton of power.
Tiny light and usb xharger
 

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I don't use any cordless tools myself, but a bit like Tool Agnostic I bought a string trimmer for my wife. She hated starting the gas trimmer and advancing the string. I bought a 20v Dewalt. They sold them in town. I had it for her birthday. This made me a great guy.
 

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P.S. I forgot to mention the Hitachi 12v drill/driver that we keep in the house. It is lightweight and comfortable to use. Its utility as an in-the-house home repair tool makes its value very high to us. On rare occasions, I bring it out to the shop if I need a second drill driver or have a lot of "easy" job where the comfort is helpful and the larger drill/driver is overkill.
 

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For my personal shop I use the Ryobi one+ line. Price is right and they work well enough for my purposes, nothing fantastic in terms of performance but they get the job done

Shop at work uses all DeWalt, with the exception of the pawn equipment which is the Greenworx brand. Price is less of a problem when the company is buying, and I've got no trouble admitting the DeWalt tools are superior to the Ryobi gear
 

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Well, I have a couple dozen or more battery powered tools. They happen to be both 18v and 20v Dewalt. I use the lights, drills, impacts, saws, router, and yard tools often. Everything else gets used as needed.
 

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Smart and Cool
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Home and Shop.

Shop:
Drills, impacts, jigsaw, reciprocating saw, circular saw, lights, fans, blowers, vac, nailers

Yard:
Hedge trimmer, chain saw, blowers

House:
Blowers, vac, fans, battery adapter to provide USB charging, lights
 

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I have a Milwaukee drill I bought for myself as a Christmas present when I needed to borrow my neighbors and he wasn't home. It's my go to drill, (have a Milwaukee corded drill also) unless I need the hammer function on the corded.

Bought a Milwaukee circular saw when I was building a board fence and didn't want to run a 700 foot extension cord.

Recently got a Milwaukee hedge trimmer. Wish the handle turned in relation to the blade.

My daughter bought me a Milwaukee light, has 3 different brightnesses and runs on battery or plugs in. Really like this thing. Use it all the time. Handy to slide under the car when I'm under it.

All take the same charger so that makes it easy.
 

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Milwaukee 18V: impact, drill, oscillating, circular, recip saw, right angle drill (y)

DeWalt 12V - 2 drills. I like a lightweight drill & I like having at least 2.

Bosch 12V impact - great for most jobs light & no so heavy.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Milwaukee 18V: impact, drill, oscillating, circular, recip saw, right angle drill (y)

DeWalt 12V - 2 drills. I like a lightweight drill & I like having at least 2.

Bosch 12V impact - great for most jobs light & no so heavy.
I've got more than one drill because I use 3 different bits when making cabinets:
A pilot hole, a counter sink and a driver, each in a different drill. I don't use the impacts in wood because they will "overdrive" the screws and bury the heads. A drill gives more me control at the final 1/8" of length.
 

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I converted from my Makita/Dewalt/ryobi hodge podge to all Rigid. Have two hammer drills, two impact drivers, reciprocating saw, circ saw, finish nailer, hand router, finish and RO sanders, angle grinder, and oscillating tool set as well as the cordless shop vac. Have never had any issues with any of them and the warranty on the battery is what makes me stick with them. Haven’t had to claim any myself but my dad had to about 6 months ago and it was super smooth process.

I’m a hobbiest admittedly but I’ve build privacy fences, re done wood paneling, drilled and anchored concrete for new pool anchor cups, etc. never had one fail to perform.
 

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Milwaukee 18V: impact, drill, oscillating, circular, recip saw, right angle drill (y)

DeWalt 12V - 2 drills. I like a lightweight drill & I like having at least 2.

Bosch 12V impact - great for most jobs light & no so heavy.
I like the Dewalt 12v format, light, and very powerful. Unfortunately it is the step child to the 20v system...
 

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What are the different grades or categories of cordless drills?
Welcome to the forum.

That's a wide question, I'll focus on something that's confusing to me.
A drill driver, when in driver mode you can put in or remove small to medium size screws, you set how much torque it stops at.

An impact driver is for screws in tougher situations, instead of a smooth turn it jerks, as if you are trying to remove a stuck bolt and hit the end of the wrench with a hammer. To your hand it still feels fairly smooth. Popular for things like screwing down the boards of an outdoor deck. I rarely use one for wood working, most of the time a drill-driver is perfect for me.

https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DCD709B-Brushless-Compact-Cordless/dp/B07VCC8R8C A hammer drill is for drilling concrete, stone etc. As it turns it as if you hitting the end of a drill bit with a hammer, to break the material at the bit point.

https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-Cordless-Impact-Wrench-DCF894B/dp/B078WDTV2F An impact wrench is for machines, nuts and bolts.

I like DeWalt for hobby use, it is good for the price, I don't need the toughest, most professional tool on the planet. https://www.amazon.com/Festool-574700-Cordless-Drill/dp/B06XPB6JL1 I don't doubt the Festool is good, but is the extra cost worth it for me?
 
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