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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Rewired the 4512 for 220V yesterday and it was pretty effortless. Rewiring the motor took all of 3 minutes as it's just a matter of redoing a couple of wire nuts and the connections are shown on the inside of the wire housing cover. I already had 220 in the garage for my air compressor but only 1 outlet, so it took me longer to go get another box and plug, run some conduit and tap off the existing box than rewiring the 4512.

What I really needed and did was splice in another 15' of 14ga cord so that I wouldn't need an extension cord and can now move it pretty much wherever I want in the garage. The 120 lines already had a few items on them so this gave me a dedicated line (I won't run the compressor at the same time I'm running the saw).

Saw spins up immediately (and I mean when you turn it on it's at full rpm's) and didn't struggle at all when I ripped a piece of 1" oak with a 50T combo Freud.

I'd take pics but it doesn't look any different except now it has 20' of power cord. :icon_smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think that the difference that you are experiencing is due to half the current travelling through your extension cord. In engineering terms, "Less of an IR drop".
Agree that this is a very likely and important part of the equation, and add in other items that were on the line (lights0) as well. My change wasn't apples to apples and so unfortunately I can't say how much was due to 220, nor can I say how much was the prior line/extension. My goal was to eliminate all of that and I could have done so and kept it at 120 but I figured while I was at it why not switch it since it was no extra effort.

As for 14ga - the romex line itself is very short to the box. The 20' of power cord is well within spec for the motor and each pole only needs to carry 6.5A. That's a non-issue, not even considering the plus of having 220 pushing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes, I cut the existing cord right at the plug to retain as much of it as possible. I soldered the wires and used heat-shrink on the individual strands and then heat-shrink over the whole thing to make it seamless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I would replace that ASAP. I don't believe heat shrink is rated for that type of use.
Just my recommendation but I would suggest confirming un-surety first, and then giving such immediate/drastic direction. I don't want this to come out as a slam, and apologize in advance if it's taken as such, I just found it odd you had the sequence backwards.

Standard heat shrink is rated at 600V and many have it actually printed on the product. My splicing is fine.
 
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