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Exiled to Missouri
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Discussion Starter #1
I thought I'd fly out on a limb with this stool design. Please provide me with any and all constructive criticism on it. I am planning to make the entire project from 3/4" plywood. Basic dimensions are currently 27" high, 15" wide, and 16" deep. Thank you.
 

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Very intriguing design! I like the combination of arches and curves.

Only thing that really pops out as a little out of place is the lower leg stretchers. They have the only straight lines in the design and the rounded ends don't really fit with the way you terminate other curves. I think it might look better if you mimic the upper leg stretcher maybe with the arch pointing down like the seat.
 

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maker of crooked things
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I would do somthing about the sharp up cut on the foot rest, looks to sharp for bare or sock foot, and might catch shoe treads maybe copy the seat curve for the foot rest and the upper strecher for the lower strecher
 

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puffessional Scrabbleist
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stool sample

I like it. It will be heavy but stable. Only advice...soften that seat edge. It's possibly at eye level with tots that tend to run.
TonyM
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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I like the design.

When you mention bare feet I'm thinking a damp environment for some reason. Plywood doesn't do real well in wet environments.

Plywood does not really like sharp corners. You have a lot of acute angles at the edges of the plywood.

The acute angles on the foot rest would be uncomfortable.
 

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I like the way the peak of the lower stretcher mimics the upper union of the leg. The legs/stretchers form a very beautiful and compelling shape.

Nice mix of Gothic and Asian influences.
 

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The design is unique and intriguing. Would fit well in a modern house with modern furniture.

Unless you have something planned that you did not discuss, I think the actual product will look terrible made of plywood. All of the edges need some type of covering.

I also think those sharp edges will be subject to excessive chipping and or breaking.

George
 

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CNC cut or hand cut? The CNC will leave rounded inside corners thanks to the round bit. You won't get those sharp inside corners. If it is a good quality plywood (consider Baltic Birch) you won't need stretchers. I'd flip the footrest over. I bought a stool that had a square profile stretcher and it was the first thing I knew was wrong when I sat on the stool. Rounded it off with a 1" round over bit and it is far better. Then I'd round over all the sharp edges. 1/8" radius would be enough and barely change the look.

If you use cheap plywood, and are simply gluing the layers together, the chair may fail between the layers. If you are CNCing the parts, include alignment holes on the inner pieces that you can put a wood or steel dowel through. It'll make gluing them up easier, and tend to keep the stack from splitting.

I have one or two students each semester that does a plywood stack project. They are expensive, as you waste much of the plywood around the parts. They are usually heavier than any solid wood project is simply because the grain direction and qualities of most hard woods lead to sleeker solutions.

When you have it together, expect a few days of sanding. The edge of Baltic Birch ply can shine and it should if it is the main visual feature of your design. Often designs like yours look better when the plywood layers don't distract from the form itself. The reality of your design is that it may look very busy in stripes against the face grain of the plywood. Your rendering looks good because it homogenizes the form. One trick I like it to laminate the outer faces with a nice neutral color. it'll draw focus to the striped edge.

Now if you ARE CNCing it, I would make the first one from as cheap of plywood as you can find. This prototype will tell you what is right and wrong with the ergonomics. You may discover you need a hand grip in the sides to make it easy to pick up and move. Something easy to add to the final version in good wood.

4D
 

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Exiled to Missouri
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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I made some alterations became disgusted with it and am returning back to the design. The first picture is the current incarnation. I have the foot rest off right now because I am leaning towards something different. I'm also considering redoing the top, making it adjustable and possibly more circular in design. A bigger change is thinning the legs down from 2.25" to 1.5". Will see where it goes. The second picture was the direction I went in when I was fed-up with the design.

To answer some of the questions and comments.

George C: It depends a lot on the type of plywood. I've noticed a lot more designs, which are incorporating laminated birch plywood. Joe Manus' multifunctional desk is what made me start thinking about trying it out on a project. I also plan to soften the edges during construction.

4DThinker: I was thinking a mixture of hand cutting and a template bit on a router, as well as a band saw and the spindle sander. And thank you for the advice.

rrich: It will be in a dry environment.

TonyM: Kids aren't an issue, but I do plan to soften the edges some.
 

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