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HALL OF FAMER
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off, let me start by saying that in no way, shape, or form, is the idea for these jaws of my own doing. I got the instructions on line and I just took some pictures as I was going to pass the information on to you fine folks as I like to do.
The dilema started when I priced One Way's jumbo jaws for the lathe. :eek: I was shocked at the price of them and decided to ask if anyone here had made their own. I got a ton of great information from you guys and decided to make my own Cole jaws and post a build/tutorial thread. So, here we go.

I started of with a 10" X 10" square of 1/2" plywood and drawing a line from corner to corner, I marked the center.
Paper Paper product Tile Square Flooring



I then removed the jaws from my chuck and laid them out on the plywood. I marked the position of the mounting holes and carefully drilled and countersunk for the plywood to accept the bolts. The hole in the top left corner was just me testing drill size for the bolts in the waste area.
Wood Paper Circle Plywood Pattern



The next step was to draw the circumference of my "Kenbo jaws" :laughing:.
Paper Circle Pattern Wood Tile




Time to cut the circumference. I chose to use the scroll saw, but you can use the band saw, jig saw or whatever your little heart desires.
Vehicle




I then drew a line, 22.5 degrees on either side of each center line. These lines will provide equal spacing of our hold downs at a later step.
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HALL OF FAMER
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
You should now have something that resembles this.
Circle Wood Table Ceiling




I then mounted the disc onto my jaw chuck using the bolts that normally hold the jaws in place. I then mounted the chuck on my lathe.
Machine Machine tool Tool Lathe Tool accessory




Starting from the outside and measuring in, I marked lines on the disc at 1/2" incrememts. These will be the lines for adjusting the rubber feet that hold your work.
Abrasive saw Circular saw Tool accessory Miter saw Tool



I then turned the disc round, and rounded the edges to soften them a little. Using my parting tool, I cut a groove at each 1/2" increment that I marked in the previous step. These don't have to be too deep, they are just to make the lines permanent.
Tire Automotive wheel system Tool accessory Rim Wheel





I then drilled a 1/8" holes along the 22.5 degree lines that we drew earlier at each of the "permanent" lines that we made with our parting tool. :blink: I can't explain it much better than that. Here's a pic.
Circle Ceiling
 

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HALL OF FAMER
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I purchase some of these rubber bumpers from that big orange place for this project. They are rather inexpensive and worked very well for this application.
Ipod




Using my scroll saw (again) I seperated the sections of the "Kenbo jaws" and sanded each piece. I used a wood burner to number each piece clockwise. I did this because I want to be able to mount them in the same configuration each time. My straight lines were not as straight as they could have been and on my next set that I make, I will pay more attention to that when seperating the pieces.
I then mounted the rubber bumpers, upside down using a 1" screw and a #10 flat washer. I mounted them in the appropriate row of permanent lines to suit my project. I then used the existing mounting hardware and bolted my new Kenbo jaws to my chuck. It looks like this.
Table Wood Coffee table Circle




I then mounted my chuck on the lathe, secured my bowl and proceded to turn the bottom of my project.
Machine Toolroom Machine tool Disc brake Metalworking



I had a lot of fun making this project and was very happy with the results. So happy, in fact, that I probably could have crapped rainbows. :laughing:

I hope that by posting this simple little tutorial, that some of you will try and make your own as well. I would like to point out, that these type of jaws are not rated for full speed turning. Take it easy, with light cuts and lower speeds. Safety first guys. :thumbsup:
Thanks for looking.
 

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Just in time!

Awesome, this is just what I needed! I have the mini cole jaws for my G3 and they arnt quite big enough for my project. This post came just in time, thanks a bunch!
Tom
 

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Thanks for taking the extra time to document and photo your steps, Ken -- and nice work, btw.

One thing I discovered when using Cole jaws -- pay attention when stopping the lathe.

I once turned off the power without slowing it all the way down first, and the inertia of the spinning chuck plus those big jaws was enough to unscrew the chuck from the drive shaft. Luckily it didn't break anything. :eek:
 

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Thanks for posting your steps. I've seen these made from plywood before but wasn't sure how well they worked. Since you seem to be fairly happy with them :laughing:, looks like I'll give it a shot and build me a set.
 

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Very very cool, Kenbo. Thanks for sharing and linking this thread in the tutorial link. If I ever get back out to my shop I might even get a chance to build some of these since I want to do a couple bowls with some blanks I got from TexasTimbers.
 

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I purchase some of these rubber bumpers from that big orange place for this project. They are rather inexpensive and worked very well for this application.
View attachment 42966



Using my scroll saw (again) I seperated the sections of the "Kenbo jaws" and sanded each piece. I used a wood burner to number each piece clockwise. I did this because I want to be able to mount them in the same configuration each time. My straight lines were not as straight as they could have been and on my next set that I make, I will pay more attention to that when seperating the pieces.
I then mounted the rubber bumpers, upside down using a 1" screw and a #10 flat washer. I mounted them in the appropriate row of permanent lines to suit my project. I then used the existing mounting hardware and bolted my new Kenbo jaws to my chuck. It looks like this.
View attachment 42967



I then mounted my chuck on the lathe, secured my bowl and proceded to turn the bottom of my project.
View attachment 42968


I had a lot of fun making this project and was very happy with the results. So happy, in fact, that I probably could have crapped rainbows. :laughing:

I hope that by posting this simple little tutorial, that some of you will try and make your own as well. I would like to point out, that these type of jaws are not rated for full speed turning. Take it easy, with light cuts and lower speeds. Safety first guys. :thumbsup:
Thanks for looking.
thanks you just saved me around 100$ from this thread. keep em coming love your work
 

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I wood if I could.
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So happy, in fact, that I probably could have crapped rainbows. :laughing:
Don't fret it, man. I got you covered.



Nice chuck. It should serve you well. I know you said it isn't your idea but I like it. It's pretty clever.
 
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