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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I ran across some interesting wood. Osage Orange or hedge. I decided to get some and make a coffee table out of it. I love the golden yellow, which will go great in our living room. I am going to keep it as a live edge with one side wrapping over as a support. Haven't decided what to do on the other side for support yet. Attached is a pic of the slab. It has quite a crack down the middle so ill have to put in a few bow ties. Never done that, so this will be the first. As I go through this, I'd appreciate any and all all feedback during this project. The first question is how thick should I get this cut? I am thinking two inches but maybe I don't need it that thick. It is around 24" across and obviously wider at the Y. Probably make it 4' long. Let the feedback begin.

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Discussion Starter #3
Yep I found that out a couple of days ago. Correct me if I am wrong but I understand that it will take several years to change. I guess I'll just sand it down again at some point.
 

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You might ask your local paint store for a clear finish with UV blocker in it. I know I have seen some advertised in the past but don't recall the brand. As I remember it was in an article where they had built something out of Box Elder and had used the product to keep the pinkish sparring form fading away.
 

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In the world of automotive painting (another hobby of mine), the better grade urethane clear coats are UV blocking.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So is the color shift a UV issue or something else? So, more coats slow the shift?
 

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It's oxidation (air) and uv.
Also the slab is going to change as it dries, and the slab needs dried properly. The crack will likely grow, and (personally) I don't think bow ties will hold it during the drying process. You might consider flat metal stock screwed in on the bottom side during the drying (and I leave it on afterwards). 24" x 48" is a good sized coffee table. I would slice it to 2", let it dry and then get it planed down when the moisture hits 6-8%. You'll likely end up at 1.5-1.75" afterwards.
Finishes? I use 2 part epoxy, and then top coat with a waterbased poly after. Epoxy and lacquers seem to pop out grains and colors.

I do a lot of live edge projects. Wild grains have a life of their own, unlike their straight laced cousins.
Gnarlywooddesigns.weebly.com
 
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