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Enough of this nonsense, I need a board 3 1/8" wide, I set the fence moving the pointer to land on 3 1/8", I switch on the saw and power feed then watch the board run through the saw, does this mean I am not really a woodworker?
If you're only reason for cutting the board 3 1/8" wide was to have a board 3 1/8" wide, then no, you're not a woodworker. Anyone can make an accurate cut on a table saw if it actually does all the work except initial set up. If you give that perfectly cut 3 1/8" board to a CNC operator, and they put it in a programmed machine that cuts a sign into it, they aren't woodworking either.
The CNC operator then hands it to a person who cleans up the sign, sands it and then finishes it ... THAT guy is probably a woodworker.
I believe, when you prep a piece of wood for the machine, you're working the wood. When you finish the CNC cut piece, you're woodworking. The detailed work the CNC machine did ... you don't get credit for as a woodworker. You get credit for it as a computer programmer, but not for the wood work.
Putting an IKEA cabinet together doesn't make you a cabinet maker. Putting the finishing touches on a CNC made sign doesn't make you a sign carver.
 

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Bah humbug
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That sounds like manual labor...

We had three programmers at Jakobe. None of the three touched the CNC. All three college educated. One was released because he only knew Rhino...

They made more than me.

We had 2 Morbidelli and 1 Thermwiod we eventually sold. I believe it was only a half sheet CNC...
 

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David it's just my opinion from years working around CNC. Nothing personal...
No offense taken, at all. I've never used a CNC, so I have nothing but uninformed opinion on this.

I recently saw a wooden rocking horse, that would "transform" into a high chair and into a small child's desk with seat. I wish I had taken pictures of it. I was amazed at how it could be folded around so easily into so many different things...all very functional.

I assumed it was made with a CNC (the owner had purchased it). It looked like the assembly would be very easy, but the design was incredible. I have always assumed that with a CNC most of the work was in the design and programming, and then a bit of assembly. I was more than impressed by that piece. I just think of it as more designing than making. How much you can separate those two arts is a question I doubt there is an answer to.
 

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No offense taken, at all. I've never used a CNC, so I have nothing but uninformed opinion on this.

I recently saw a wooden rocking horse, that would "transform" into a high chair and into a small child's desk with seat. I wish I had taken pictures of it. I was amazed at how it could be folded around so easily into so many different things...all very functional.

I assumed it was made with a CNC (the owner had purchased it). It looked like the assembly would be very easy, but the design was incredible. I have always assumed that with a CNC most of the work was in the design and programming, and then a bit of assembly. I was more than impressed by that piece. I just think of it as more designing than making. How much you can separate those two arts is a question I doubt there is an answer to.
If I were doing production work for a living I would probably have a CNC, if I could figure out how to program it...
 

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Bah humbug
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For production it's the key to many businesses. In our shop it ran 8-12 hours a day. One machine we load the other loads itself. The one that loads itself does straight parts , the other we load and does all curves...

They were just getting into designs in wood..

Yesturday we your mom use embroider designs in shirts we use to admire the work because it took time. Today machines do the same thing.
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Discussion Starter #30
Id like to thank everyone of you who shared and gave me feedback though this process. You have been so helpful and I cant thank you enough. I'm going to try to contribute more than I take from now on and make it worth your while. But thank you again for taking the time.
 
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