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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is a "how come' question.

I am a rightie. When making a cut, it just seems more natural for me to have the 'fall-away' piece on the right side. However, every circ. saw I ever owned, the short side of the foot (base plate) is on the left, which means the cut-off piece drops on the right if I do it my way, which is incorrect because I am using the short side of the base plate.

So how come they dont make the wide side of the foot on the left of the blade for righties. I almost feel like I am off balance doing it the correct by the book way. The only reason I could think of is the motor might get in the way if you used clamps on a straight edge, Although, that has never really been a problem for me.
Doing it by the book, the cut of piece will always land on my foot

So, How Come?
 

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You know you are suppose to have the wood on 4 saw horses, clamped down, have your full face shield on and gloves to make a cut like that. What's to fall off. Me, more often than not I hold the wood up with my left hand and make the cut with the right hand.
 

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Tony,

You need a circular saw with the blade on the right side. Then you will not have to deal with the cutoffs landing on your foot! :smile2:

Tom
 

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You should have both!

I probably a few circ saws, including 5 battery powered ones, 4 worm drives and maybe 5 sidewinders and there's a left blade in each type. Well, worm drives are left blade regardless. I just checked, the 4 1/2" PC trim saw has a right blade. See photo below.

Here's what I've learned about circ saws. When cutting construction lumber to length, I use a speed square or crosscut guide so I don't need to follow a line by eye. I first make a small kerf on the mark, then set the saw blade into it and run the guide up against the base. That way I know I'm cutting right where I want to without looking.

When cutting panels to size from a 4 X 8, I use a straight edge guide set to 1 1/2" from my mark which is the distance to the saw's base and just run the saw along the guide without needing a line. For really rough cuts I can follow a pencil or chalk line "close enough" and if the panel is well supported, it really doesn't matter which side the blade is on. Yes, on a right blade saw, the base always rests on the workpiece and the cut off falls away on the right. If you use a left blade saw resting on the cutoff, you better have a firm grip on the saw or everything will fall off as the cut breaks through. Worm drives are heavy enough, so you'll see carpenters and framers make their cuts vertically downward so they aren't resting the base on the cutoff.

I would suggest, if you already have a battery powered line of tools to go ahead and get a battery circ saw. For occasional cuts on panels you'll have a fully charged battery regardless. I have the 5 3/8" Dewalt right blade trim saw and a left blade Milwaukee 6 1/2" and have enough extra charged batteries to do all my cuts. I rarely break out a corded saw anymore, except for cuts 2" thick or greater. I really like not having a cord to fuss with. I needed to make curved arch cuts on 10 ft long sections of my board on board fences using the Dewalt trim saw and it was a breeze with no dangling cord.
 

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* Cordless saws are almost always left bladed. There are rare exceptions.
* Corded saws with a worm drive (such as old SkilSaws) are almost always left bladed. There are rare exceptions.
* Corded saws with a direct drive motor were almost always right bladed in the past, but that has changed. Now there are many examples of both types.

Speaking only for myself, I prefer left bladed circular saws. I use my right hand to push the saw, and I like having the blade closer to me. Watching the cut line seems easier as I guide the saw. I know others who prefer the right blade saws. It may be more about what you grew up with or owned first.
 

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This is a "how come' question.

I am a rightie. When making a cut, it just seems more natural for me to have the 'fall-away' piece on the right side. However, every circ. saw I ever owned, the short side of the foot (base plate) is on the left, which means the cut-off piece drops on the right if I do it my way, which is incorrect because I am using the short side of the base plate.

So how come they dont make the wide side of the foot on the left of the blade for righties. I almost feel like I am off balance doing it the correct by the book way. The only reason I could think of is the motor might get in the way if you used clamps on a straight edge, Although, that has never really been a problem for me.
Doing it by the book, the cut of piece will always land on my foot

So, How Come?

My very old Craftsman circ saw has wide on left under motor. Short side is on right.


George
 

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Which side has the blade?

The widest part of the saw base is under the motor and the narrow part is either to the right of left of the blade. So, the blade determines where the cutoff piece should be. As a "righty" I want the cutoff piece to fall on the right so I can rest the weight of saw and motor on the workpiece to be saved, so I use a right blade saw for construction.


For panel work, it doesn't usually matter about the weight of the saw, since the panel is large and supported by sawhorses or a table of sorts. What does matter is that your straight edge edge will fit under the motor with the blade at full cutting depth. That typically means having the narrow part of the base against the straight edge guide, which in most cases is 1 1/2" to the blade:
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/4-x-8-panel-cross-cuts-10476/#post82269


Notice this is a 24 Volt battery saw with a right hand blade:



 
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