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Wow. Good ol' regretsy! $200 for a 2 mitered pieces of home depot oak. Yeesh.


Anyway, apart from accidentally doing this with a dull, poorly balance blade, I suppose you could do this but just skimming a skill saw against the edge. As if you were cutting some invisible piece off the length of the board, but just kind of wiggle the saw a little as you go. That'd be my best guess for doing that "on purpose."
 

· where's my table saw?
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just go to a circle saw mill

There will be plenty of rough sawn pieces. The Amish or Mennonites may have the old large blade mills. Steam and antique tractor events have them.
Another source might be shipping crates or pallets.
Doing it your self as suggested "might" be a little dangerous and the pattern won't be as visible and will be smaller in diameter. It might work to bend the teeth of a non carbide blade over to one side for that effect. I'd be cautious regardless. :yes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There will be plenty of rough sawn pieces. The Amish or Mennonites may have the old large blade mills. Steam and antique tractor events have them.
Another source might be shipping crates or pallets.
Doing it your self as suggested "might" be a little dangerous and the pattern won't be as visible and will be smaller in diameter. It might work to bend the teeth of a non carbide blade over to one side for that effect. I'd be cautious regardless. :yes:
Do you have any good suggestions locally? I'm in Livonia.
 

· In History is the Future
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If you just want that look buy reclaimed lumber OR take an old high speed steel blade for your table and bend one tooth in maybe 1/64" or less...

Don't saw too slowly or it will defeat the purpose.

These marks come from old circle saw mills that had poor quality control on tooth set and a slower RPM than modern saws.
 

· where's my table saw?
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32,652 Posts
locally, no.

L L Johnson in Charlotte, close to Lansing has a large mill room. If you call and ask what they use to saw/rip thier boards it may leave a rough sawn look, I donno?
A large table saw with a 16" blade would leave a similar look also.
Search "sawyers" in Oakland or Lapeer counties. Maybe Port Huron?
You obviously don't want a bandmill sawyer and the best I can think of I mentioned.... the Amish or Menonites.

try one of these:
http://www.yellowbook.com/yellow-pages/?what=Sawmills&where=Michigan

http://www.semiww.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=11965

http://www.yellowpages.com/harrison-mi/amish-sawmills
 

· In History is the Future
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6,422 Posts
It just looks like the wood was ripped on a table saw with a old fashion steel blade. They cut rougher than carbide blades.
I agree with Steve Neul, get a steel blade with a low tooth count, skim the wood on your table saw with it.
Looks like you could do that with a handheld angle grinder.
Speaking of angle grinder, I saw a angle grinder wheel at harbor freight that had chain saw cutters on it. That might work.
Or here's a slick and easy idea - bend one tooth on a steel saw blade!

It's not complicated and it doesn't have to be tedious.
 

· where's my table saw?
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bend one tooth?

It might work to bend the teeth of a non carbide blade over to one side for that effect. I'd be cautious regardless. :yes:
OK, my advice doesn't count? :blink: see post no. 3.
 
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