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Discussion Starter #1
I haven't seen this posted before but something that should be done. I just got a new 4 jaw chuck for my wood lathe, and as you open the jaws at some point they stick above the body of the chuck. Something I've done for years is on any metal lathe chuck I've installed, open it all the way and take a file, hand grinder, die grinder etc and round off the sharpe edges of the jaws. Even the front edges of the jaws also. They are very sharp and can casue a bad cut when spinning and you touch them.

I realize you shouldn't be sticking your hand in a spinning chuck, but on occasion I will grab the chuck to stop it if its almost stopped spinning.

Rounding the edges is a practice that most maintance guys do as they are installing a new chuck for the first time.

Those jaws are very sharp on top, don't ask how I know. I forgot that I never rounded the edges and now I'm missing a little hunk of hide. Ouch
 

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Not picking on you directly, but if you're going to do something as dumb as grabbing a spinning chuck to stop it, why not grab the wheel/shaft that's on the left side of the head stock instead?
 

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Not picking on you directly, but if you're going to do something as dumb as grabbing a spinning chuck to stop it, why not grab the wheel/shaft that's on the left side of the head stock instead?
I think it's a metalworkers' thing -- metal lathes often don't have an outboard handwheel.

I've never used a metal lathe, and I've never been tempted to grab at the jaws of a spinning chuck.
 

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Not smart to grab a spinning chuck no matter how rounded the jaws are. There have been a lot of posts over the years about putting those elastic colored wrist bands over the chucks to keep you from doing that and other elaborate methods. However the smartest and safest thing to do is simply to not do it.
On the more modern lathes they have an electronic brake so grabbing the chuck won't stop it anyway.
The better brands of chucks do have slightly softened or rounded edges. The cheaper Chinese and Taiwanese don't. I have 3 Vicmarcs all that have softened edges. The two chinese copies have very sharp edges.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I agree 100% that it is unsafe so I deserve a tougue lashing To defend myself a little (If possable) I don't do it when it is spinning fast. Ususally I lay my hand on it (the smooth area next to or behind the jaws) about the time it might spin 2-4 more revelutions before stoping on its own. Still not smart I agree.
I am a metel lathe user and the metal lathe chuck has a 4-5 inch flat area behind the jaws that is commonally used to finally stop a check. Not while its spinning fast though.
Also My lathe doesn't have a outboard wheel, just a stub shaft.
I can take the tounge lashings so no hard feelings.
 

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well I will admit that I can't resist the urge to slow down my drill press chuck after turning it off. Maybe that's why I'm a turner. I love to touch the spinning wood. Also not a very safe practice.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I would suggest softening the sharp edges on the chuck even if you don't intentually grab the chuck to slow it down. There have been times I''ve been cutting close to the chuck and have accidently touched the check with the back of my hand and since the edges were rounded off, there was no blood shed. Stung a little but I can handle that.
 

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tewitt1949 said:
I would suggest softening the sharp edges on the chuck even if you don't intentually grab the chuck to slow it down. There have been times I''ve been cutting close to the chuck and have accidently touched the check with the back of my hand and since the edges were rounded off, there was no blood shed. Stung a little but I can handle that.
I've got a suggestion for getting to close to your chuck. I have a piece of tape on the outside edge with a small flap of it about a half inch long. As it spins and something gets close, the flap of tape comes in contact first. Sort of a warning device before you strike any of those sharp edges with tools or flesh.
 

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I have a piece of tape on the outside edge with a small flap of it about a half inch long.

putting those elastic colored wrist bands over the chucks to keep you from doing that and other elaborate methods.

good ideas and could save some skin.
 

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Many years on a metal lathe taught me respect. I was sanding a part I had just made and didn't realize my hand was so close to the chuck. It caught my wedding band just right and folded it into my finger. I didn't lose the finger but there's a rather unsightly scar where my wedding band used to be. Since the divorce, I don't mind showing people just how dangerous marriage can be! :eek:
 

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Many years on a metal lathe taught me respect. I was sanding a part I had just made and didn't realize my hand was so close to the chuck. It caught my wedding band just right and folded it into my finger. I didn't lose the finger but there's a rather unsightly scar where my wedding band used to be. Since the divorce, I don't mind showing people just how dangerous marriage can be! :eek:
Wedding bands are terrible things to wear around machinery. Lucky you still got that finger.
 

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Wedding bands aren't great in a bar either. Really limits your choice in women. :)
LOL. Valid point I clearly missed.

Since somewhat relevant, these new titanium and tungsten rings that are out kinda make me wonder what happens in an emergency?

I will be getting married soon and have looked at some rings and to tell you the truth I really like them but they scare me. If an accident did happen, how easily removed is this ring by a staff of nurses who I'm sure have tons of power tool experience?
 

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A year or so I did a PSA that chucks hurt when they get your fingers.It pealed my thumb nail off and man o man did it hurt.It took forever to heal too.
 

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Its a long ride to your area man! If your implying what I think you are.
No implication intended (he whistled, innocently ... :laughing:)

A good friend from UK will be visiting for a few days this week, she began as a nurse in Accident & Emergency (recently retired from running 2 private hospitals). She has all sorts of stories about having to borrow tools from the maintenance department to remove things stuck on (or in) various body parts.
 

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LOL. Valid point I clearly missed.

Since somewhat relevant, these new titanium and tungsten rings that are out kinda make me wonder what happens in an emergency?

I will be getting married soon and have looked at some rings and to tell you the truth I really like them but they scare me. If an accident did happen, how easily removed is this ring by a staff of nurses who I'm sure have tons of power tool experience?
The ambulance was trying to get it off with a "ring remover". They couldn't get it under the ring though. I had waited for them out of deference to my employer's wishes. When they couldn't get it I found a pair of dikes and snipped it. I never did solder it back together and wore the ring for a long time split. It was stolen else I would have kept wearing it.
 
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