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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an old Craftsman table saw that I've been using for a while now with a believe a 1 HP motor. (It doesn't say on the plate.)
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It does the job for the most part since I normally just run 2x4 or 2x12s through but when I have to rip thick (3 - 3 1/2in) milled lumber it bogs down and sometimes flips the breaker. I went to an auction today and found a band saw which sold for $22 and can't with 2 take saws. All 3 for only $22 so yeah..I took it. One saw is a contractors saw - Grizzly G4192. Says 2 HP on the plate. (I know the plate isn't completely actuate with HP rating but it gives you something to go by.) I tried looking up info on this but wasn't able to find anything with that mod #G4192. I found that a bit weird.
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The other is a Walker Turner. I "think" it's a cabinet saw. It's plate says 1hp.
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I've read a few people saying Walker Turner was a good reputable brand and I'm fairly sure Grizzly is a fairly good brand as well.
So between the 3 which would you pick? Why is the contractors saw more powerful than the 2 older saws? Is it because it's newer, or is there something I'm missing?
 

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I have an old Craftsman table saw that I've been using for a while now with a believe a 1 HP motor. (It doesn't say on the plate.) View attachment 429436
It does the job for the most part since I normally just run 2x4 or 2x12s through but when I have to rip thick (3 - 3 1/2in) milled lumber it bogs down and sometimes flips the breaker. I went to an auction today and found a band saw which sold for $22 and can't with 2 take saws. All 3 for only $22 so yeah..I took it. One saw is a contractors saw - Grizzly G4192. Says 2 HP on the plate. (I know the plate isn't completely actuate with HP rating but it gives you something to go by.) I tried looking up info on this but wasn't able to find anything with that mod #G4192. I found that a bit weird. View attachment 429437
The other is a Walker Turner. I "think" it's a cabinet saw. It's plate says 1hp. View attachment 429438
View attachment 429439
I've read a few people saying Walker Turner was a good reputable brand and I'm fairly sure Grizzly is a fairly good brand as well.
So between the 3 which would you pick? Why is the contractors saw more powerful than the 2 older saws? Is it because it's newer, or is there something I'm missing?
The Walker Turner appears to be around 15 amps, while the other two are around 13 amps. Although we do not know the EFF rating, the Walker Turner could possibly be higher hp. Either way, for me, I would choose the cabinet saw. There is nothing wrong with contractor saws, I just prefer the easier setup and blade alignment, not having to mess with trunions like on a contractors saw.
 

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@B Coll is right, they are fairly comparable in power, and I also agree with his statement about cabinet vs. contractor saw.

Another consideration is the type and quality of fence on each saw, the overall condition, other accessories (mobile base, miter gauge, sleds, jigs?), etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Thanks for the quick replies. The WT doesn't have any throat plate which isn't a huge deal as a can make one for it of necessary. I have to clean it up and oil it to really see the true condition. I know as of right now the fence on the WT is a pita trying to move it because it keeps binding up. Again that could just be something as simple as a light sanding with a 000 pad or 1000 grit paper and a coat of wax. I'll try to get to it soon ish. There weren't any jigs that came with. The Grizzly did come with the blade safety gear.
I'm an curious about why the motor on the Grizzly is a 2hp but the WT cabinet saw is a 1hp. Wouldn't the 2hp be more powerful?

EDIT: Actually I seen to be having a bit of trouble finding a throat plate for it. Any suggestions?
429442
 

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I would concentrate of fixing up the Grizzly and leave the WT as a back burner project due to the issues you mentioned. The Grizzly will have more power, you complaint with the present saw. It may have a new/better fence than the others AND that is the top priority other than adequate HP. A crappy fence will drive you nuts each time you reset it to a different location ..... DAMHIKT!
Restoring an old table saw is time consuming and you must have the skills and tools for disassembly and maintenance. They can be made like new again, just search over at www.vintagemachinery.org for examples.
Show us photos of the Grizzly and especially the fence.
 
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How about some general images of the 3 saws?

I expect the only one of the 3 with a riving knife is the Grizzly then again, maybe not.

I use an old saw. I don't think they are for everybody. A simple repair may be easy enough but a full restoration might be a commitment of time that just isn't worth it especially when other options are available.
 

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I am not an expert, but I don't concern myself about minor differences in horsepower claims between manufacturers. The table saws you described above seem very comparable to me regarding horsepower. Here are some basic precepts that seem to work for me:
  • Sometimes the current draw (amps) is a better indication for comparison.
  • You cannot get more than 1.75 horsepower from a 120 volt tool. Maybe 2 horsepower if you stretch it.
    • Those higher power 120 volt tools draw up to 15 amps. Tools that come close to that current draw would is fairly comparable, yielding between 1.5 to 1.75 horsepower.
    • Some claim 2 horsepower. When I see that, I think "1.75 horsepower".
  • Switching a tool from 120 volts to 220 volts won't change the horsepower.
    • Switching a tool to 220 volts has other good benefits and can be worth your effort.
. . . . .

Related:
In the 1970s, Hi-Fi stereo manufacturers advertised amplifier power. They measured it in "watts per channel." Once consumers became aware of watts per channel, amplifier power claims became more and more inflated as the sellers found new, non-standard ways to measure it. Soon the ever-higher amplifier power claims lost any relation to the actual sound you got, and comparison between products became impossible because each one was measured differently. Eventually someone stepped in (the government?) and set standards to measure it.
 

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The Walker Turner appears to be around 15 amps, while the other two are around 13 amps.
If you want to compare rated currents you should do it at the same voltages. At 110V the Griz is 25.8 A, double the Craftsman and about 2/3 more than the WT.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'll take some pics. Right now they are in an area I can't get good pics and then tomorrow starts the weekly work grind with an afterwork house addition that's is currently being built so I'll need a few days lol.
 

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Maybe I didn't stress this enough, but a crappy fence will "drive you nuts" :mad: ..... Even a saw with not quite enough power for cutting thicker stuff, will turn ON and OFF every time. A crappy fence will require multiple measurements each time you move it to a different location because it may not lock parallel to your miter slot each time.
That will drive you nuts, at least it did me. I have had to work with crappy fences over the years and finally said "I'm over this!" and paid up for some really good fences, Delta's Unifence (no longer available new) and Biesmeyer's (they came with my two newest saws).
You can always "upgrade" like I did, but that can mean several hundred dollars. $$$. That won't be a huge issue in your case because you basically stole all your saws for $22.00. o_O
 
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..The table saws you described above seem very comparable to me regarding horsepower.
No, the Griz is about double the other two.

You cannot get more than 1.75 horsepower from a 120 volt tool. Maybe 2 horsepower if you stretch it.
Why not?

Those higher power 120 volt tools draw up to 15 amps. Tools that come close to that current draw would is fairly comparable, yielding between 1.5 to 1.75 horsepower.
So use a higher current circuit. You're not limited to 15 A just because it's 120 V.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Maybe I didn't stress this enough, but a crappy fence will "drive you nuts" :mad: ...
You're definitely right, no argument here. I currently have "that" bad fence with my Craftsman. It occasionally moves when I'm cutting or as I go to lock it down it'll move diagonally. More than a little frustrating and time consuming.
 

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TA: "..The table saws you described above seem very comparable to me regarding horsepower."
HoytC: No, the Griz is about double the other two.
I was referring to the table saws that would replace the underpowered 1 horsepower Craftsman table saw, the Grizzly and the Walker-Turner. With respect, the Grizzly is in the same ballpark for power as the Walker-Turner. Look at the current ratings and compare them.

TA: "You cannot get more than 1.75 horsepower from a 120 volt tool. Maybe 2 horsepower if you stretch it."
HoytC: Why not?
Because manufacturers don't build 120v tools that draw more current than 15 amps, 20 max. The reason they don't build those tools is because you don't often find 120 volt circuits that exceed 15 or 20 amps.

TA: "Those higher power 120 volt tools draw up to 15 amps. Tools that come close to that current draw would is fairly comparable, yielding between 1.5 to 1.75 horsepower."
HoytC: So use a higher current circuit. You're not limited to 15 A just because it's 120 V.
You are correct. There is no reason you can't have a higher current 120 volt circuit. The problem is that even if you had that higher current circuit, it will be very difficult to find a higher power 120 volt tool that could take advantage of it. A lower power tool will not draw more current just because it is plugged into a higher current circuit.

Those higher current 120 volt circuits are not common, so manufacturers are not likely to build tools that require them. Instead, the manufacturers build 220 volt tools for those who require more power.
 

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I was referring to the table saws that would replace the underpowered 1 horsepower Craftsman table saw, the Grizzly and the Walker-Turner. With respect, the Grizzly is in the same ballpark for power as the Walker-Turner. Look at the current ratings and compare them.
Really? You're saying that 26.8 A is about the same as 15.1 A? Looks like a lot more to me. Sounds more like a golf course than a ballpark.

Because manufacturers don't build 120v tools that draw more current than 15 amps, 20 max.
That's easily disproven by the OP's photo showing that Grizzly builds a tool that does precisely that, drawing 26.8 A, which is certainly more than either 15 or 20 A.
 
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Really? You're saying that 26.8 A is about the same as 15.1 A? Looks like a lot more to me. Sounds more like a golf course than a ballpark.

That's easily disproven by the OP's photo showing that Grizzly builds a tool that does precisely that, drawing 26.8 A, which is certainly more than either 15 or 20 A.
Dang! You are absolutely right. I saw the 13.4 without noticing the 26.8. The 13.4 matched my expectations so much that I didn't look more carefully.

-> It was my bad, and you deserve my sincere apology.

Now I am scratching my head about who would make, sell, buy, or own a 120 volt 26.8 amp tool. It would blow every fuse or circuit breaker in most every home without special, custom, very heavy wiring. It would only be suitable for shops with unusually heavy wiring.

What are we missing here?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
...I do apologize for my naivety when it comes to electricity. I don't even like touching wres when I shut off the main breaker but when you say the Grizzly pulls 26.8 amps does that make it the strongest motor? Also, the largest breaker I have in the garage is a 20amp. Would I need to dedicate a spot for a 30 amp along with a stronger outlet to handle the Grizzly?
 

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The current ratings on motors are of 2 types:
Full maximum draw at stall or start up.
Running draw under normal operation.
They don't always tell which type they are giving you..... o_O
The Grizzly says FLA followed by 26.8. That stands for Full Load Current:
Even the 26.8 AMP draw may only be momentary during a stall. If so, then a 20 AMP circuit may be enough? I donno?
Having said that, more supply AMPs is always better than not enough.
You can also tell by the plug at the end of the power cord.
Different types of plugs are rated for different amounts of current draw:
 
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I have an old Craftsman table saw that I've been using for a while now with a believe a 1 HP motor. (It doesn't say on the plate.) View attachment 429436
It does the job for the most part since I normally just run 2x4 or 2x12s through but when I have to rip thick (3 - 3 1/2in) milled lumber it bogs down and sometimes flips the breaker. I went to an auction today and found a band saw which sold for $22 and can't with 2 take saws. All 3 for only $22 so yeah..I took it. One saw is a contractors saw - Grizzly G4192. Says 2 HP on the plate. (I know the plate isn't completely actuate with HP rating but it gives you something to go by.) I tried looking up info on this but wasn't able to find anything with that mod #G4192. I found that a bit weird. View attachment 429437
The other is a Walker Turner. I "think" it's a cabinet saw. It's plate says 1hp. View attachment 429438
View attachment 429439
I've read a few people saying Walker Turner was a good reputable brand and I'm fairly sure Grizzly is a fairly good brand as well.
So between the 3 which would you pick? Why is the contractors saw more powerful than the 2 older saws? Is it because it's newer, or is there something I'm missing?
All the motors say V 110 / 220
So you can wire it to 220.
It will give you a much stronger motor.
 

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Nope.
Horsepower is the same whether running on 230 volts or 115 volts. One HP is equal to 745 watts. To get your motors wattage, you multiple the amperage draw times the operating voltage. HP = AMPs X Volts. A motor will draw 1/2 the amps on 230 volts that it does on 115 volts, so the wattage remains the same because the voltage is one half. Therefore the HP is the same.
What will make a difference is the power supply wires to the motor can carry less amperage more easily, given the same size wire. The longer the wire the greater the resistance to current flow, so if you can reduce the needed amperage, it will seem like the motor has more power. NOPE, it's just getting more current.

If your water pump can deliver 5 gallons per minute and you use a 1" hose it will take longer to fill the bucket than if you use a 3" hose. The amount will still be the same, 5 gallons in one minute.
 
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