Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for a good set of chisels and have been looking at the Stanley Sweetheart set as this is my price range. I'd love a set of Lie-Nelsons but a little to pricey for me at the moment. Anyone have a set of these or another in the $220 price range that are really good? Any info would be great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
harvest said:
I'm looking for a good set of chisels and have been looking at the Stanley Sweetheart set as this is my price range. I'd love a set of Lie-Nelsons but a little to pricey for me at the moment. Anyone have a set of these or another in the $220 price range that are really good? Any info would be great.
Greetings from a fellow ct member. I can't give much advice on new chisels but that many on here like the narex chisels. All of mine are vintage, mostly from garage sales. Lots available around here. High-quality best price, if you have the time to look.

If you go with the sweethearts, we would do well to check out tools-plus.com they have them at $169. They are in Waterbury, so if you are ever down that way, you can save on shipping. Brass city records is there also, tons of vintage for cheap (vs dirt cheap at yard sales).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,801 Posts
I recently read somewhere, may have been Chris shwarz' blog, about not buying a set as most of us have just 2-3 go to chisels even when we have a set. Depending on the type work you are doing it might be better to just pick up 2-3 in the sizes you are most likely to use. For me that's 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm starting a new job and they told me to make sure I had a good set of chisels. They make custom windows and doors and millwork as well. They also do some do some cabinetry and other stuff. I don't want to spend a ton of money but would like a good set.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
825 Posts
I don't own any "sets" of chisels. The majority were made in the early twentieth century. The exceptions are a 1" and 1 1/4" Stanley Sweetheart that I purchased during a trip to Woodcrafters. They work very well for me; hold an edge well, and feel good in the hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,781 Posts
I'm a real sucker for pairs of skews: they fit right into so much of my wood carving style.
So, I bought a pair of Narex 1/2" from Lee Valley. Scrubbed them back from 25 degrees to 20 degrees and tuned them up.
They hold/held an edge for so long, without honing, that I bought a second pair not 10 days later.
If I needed a variety of chisels for mill-work, I'd try the Narex line.
I think that they are inexpensive for what I got.
That's a comparison with some other, top-brand carving skews, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
825 Posts
I'm a real sucker for pairs of skews: they fit right into so much of my wood carving style. So, I bought a pair of Narex 1/2" from Lee Valley. Scrubbed them back from 25 degrees to 20 degrees and tuned them up. They hold/held an edge for so long, without honing, that I bought a second pair not 10 days later. If I needed a variety of chisels for mill-work, I'd try the Narex line. I think that they are inexpensive for what I got. That's a comparison with some other, top-brand carving skews, too.
If they hold an edge at 20 degrees, I may have to try some Narex chisels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,781 Posts
I've got nothing against the factory grind of 25 degrees. It's a big wedge to push wood open at
when hand carving. 20 is a whole lot easier on my hands (standard carving gouge bevel angle.)
Mind you, I'm working in western red cedar but more and more these days in birch. Some mahogany
this winter, I hope.

Of the second pair, I jointed one and made a double bevel wood carver's stop chisel. I've kept
the other at 25, useful for the inletting to haft crooked knife blades, sharpen pencils. . . .
all that good stuff.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top