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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This are my only cherry project. Love the color and grain but really hard to work with. This is also my only attempt to do a curved front table. Looks good from the front but not so good under the front. Made two small and one large table. These now are in my daughter's foyer.
 

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Very nice. Why do you feel cherry is hard to work with? I've just done a few small projects, mostly with hand tools, and found it very easy to work.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It seemed to chip out really easy when I was making the ogees around the table top with my router. I did those in many passes to prevent chipping. Also doesn't plane very well because of the random grain. I made a sled to hold the legs in order to do the tapers after I glued them up. I used a spindle sander with the largest drum and coarsest paper to do the curves. then lots of hand sanding.
 

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jwk070742 said:
This are my only cherry project. Love the color and grain but really hard to work with. This is also my only attempt to do a curved front table. Looks good from the front but not so good under the front. Made two small and one large table. These now are in my daughter's foyer.
Well those tables look great. I know what you mean about hard to plane. I try to use newly sharp blades and when power planing, make the last thickness pass a micro cut. As your sending the boards through on the first passes take note of the tear out and reverse the board on the next pass. If it comes out cleaner. Stop and leave that side alone and continue to your desired thickness on the other side. Find the right direction of feed and again. Make your last pass a micro cut.

When routing cherry I most times use a brand new cutter to insure success. Some times I use a climb cut to reduce the splitting.

I'm not the best with a hand plane so I tend to over use my cabinet scraper. But it's still faster and better than sanding.

Your tables look great and good for you on making the bow front.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Masterofnone
I like that handle!!
To make the curved front first I planed the cherry board down to 1/4 thick. I then made a straight backup board out of pine. I used a 2 x 6 which I planed down to 1 inch by 4.5 tall. I then made 3 ribs out of 2 x 4. I made a template of the curve I wanted. I drew the curve I wanted to have on them with the template and cut them out with a sabre saw ( I don't have a band saw ) (its on my wish list ) I sanded each one to the curved lines I made with my template. I then glued them to the straight 1 x 4.5 pine board. I left this assemble plenty long. I used every clamp I have when I glued the cherry to the backup board. I did it in 3 steps. middle first then each end. Held my breath as I closed the clamps.
As I said earlier the underside is not very neat but they look good from the front. I don't think I'll try this again. Too much work!!
Hope this gives you some idea of how I made the curved front.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you

Thank you all for your kind words. My daughter is really happy with the tables. I also think cherry is one of the most beautiful woods to built with. Love the grain and color. The end result makes it worth all the extra work and care to finish the project.

Jerry
 
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