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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone
This is Paolo, from the www.chatometry.com team.
I just wanted to share something about what we've been doing last years. Basically, we identified a reliable method to measure wood chatoyance, and we measured it on thousands of wood samples.
Now the useful info: we put together a summary table showing the typical chatoyance value of many wood species - here:
Each wood can be clicked to reach its specific page, which shows some example of chatoyance on that wood.

And this is just one example of how chatoyance can be visually captured:
Brown Wood Flooring Beige Pattern

(Koa sanded to 1500-grit & no finish)

I hope these data can actually help some of you :)
Paolo
 

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I did not know that term for that light reflecting aspect. I did, however, experience that effect when finish sanding ER Cedar slabs, for small table tops, observing the wood at different angles to determine if the tops were sanded evenly as per the grain.... if that makes sense. I think that's what I was looking at, experiencing that aspect - chatoyance - when doing that sanding.

Similarly, for those wanting to upholster a piece: Before applying fabric, study the fabric (in good light) at different angles to see if there is a preferred sheen, if applicable. Sometimes fabric, with no definitive pile, will have the weave a particular way, such that, a different sheen will appear when viewing from a particular direction. This is usually applicable with fabric that has no pattern printed onto the fabric, i.e., solid colored fabric. You may want (or not want) a sheen to be visible when looking down onto a piece of furniture.... or want (or not want) the sheen to be visible on the seat cushion when looking from a frontal view.

Sonny
 

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Similarly, for those wanting to upholster a piece: Before applying fabric, study the fabric (in good light) at different angles to see if there is a preferred sheen, if applicable.
Sonny - so if you were doing a piece that had two seat cushions (as an example), you would need to be sure to put the fabric in the same direction on each cushion so that it looks the same, correct? How would you arrange the fabric on other pieces, like arms, back, etc.? I could see it looking like slightly different fabric based on how you do it.
 

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When you buy carpet you run your hand across it to raise the grain...

Usually when I use a light on a table, etc I'm looking for missed defects,.
 

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so if you were doing a piece that had two seat cushions (as an example), you would need to be sure to put the fabric in the same direction on each cushion so that it looks the same, correct?
Yes.

How would you arrange the fabric on other pieces, like arms, back, etc.? I could see it looking like slightly different fabric based on how you do it.
Beyond the seat cushion orientation, it doesn't matter what the other pieces will look like, but how the fabric is applied.... An explanation of this " doesn't matter" and "fabric application" needs clarifying.....

On this leather chair (2 chairs), I'm changing from leather to cloth fabric. The pattern on the fabric needs to point upward when installed onto the chair's elements. The pattern needs to point FORWARD when applied onto the seat cushion.
Photograph Motor vehicle Light Automotive design Vehicle


Gas Wood Flooring Electric blue Gadget


Blue Azure Automotive tire Red Aqua


For fabric with a pile, the pile needs to point downwards when applied to vertical elements. When applied to seat cushions, the pile is pointed forward, towards the front of the seating. The pile is pointed downwards on the boxing (sides) of the seat cushion, since the sides (boxing) are vertical elements of the seat cushion. Common sense - don't apply the boxing fabric with the pile pointing left or right on the cushion's sides.

Whether your fabric has a pattern, a pile or a sheen, you first of all determine, on the bolt of fabric, what is to be the up direction/orientation and what is to be the down direction/orientation. A fabric's sheen, if applicable, is one aspect to consider when determining what is up and what is down. When applying the fabric to the different furniture elements, apply the fabric as per its previously established up and down orientation. For these other elements, the sheen is not the determining factor. It's the original determined fabric orientation that determines its application on these other elements. The sheen won't/doesn't matter, is no longer a consideration, with these other elements.

Does this make sense?
Sonny
 

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@SonnyAgain

I had to read it a few times, but yes, it makes sense. I think it will sink in better if I had a bolt of fabric to look at.

I have limited experience with doing upholstery, seat cushions on two dinning room sets is about it. I always wanted to do more. I've looked at how-to books but haven't found one I thought was very good. Years ago (early 90s?) there were a couple of guys who did furniture repair and upholstery on TV. I think they were called the furniture guys, but the show had a different name. They clowned around, but I felt like you learned from the show. If I remember correctly, they had Grandpa from the Munsters on the show a few times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Anyway, if you know of some very chatoyant wood species please let us know, and we'll try to find and characterize them.
Koa is the current n.1, but we only tested ~100 species out of over 10'000 out there, so statistic says there's something even better than Koa!
Paolo
 
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