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I asked this question on top of another post but I figure it may be easier to just post it separately. I was charring a pine table top last night and to my dismay, I found that when I was done that the sides had warped upwards. I imagine this is from the heat of the torch shrinking the fibers on that side of the table, but now it wont lay flat without being clamped to my workbench. Is there a way to make it sit flat again? Maybe charring the underside?
 

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After looking at the picture on the previous post, I think you will be fine because you will attach the table top to sides and this should pull the top back flat.
Charring is usually confined to a rustic look. It can give a bland piece of lumber a bold pattern.
Pre-staining is usually limited to softer woods to help balance the color of light and dark befote the actual stain is applied.
Stain is used to color the wood or enhance the grain of wood prior to the final finish being applied. Stains can be made in any color.
 

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Hello Chughes10,

First, here is a link to more reading that you may find insightful...

焼き杉 Yakisugi

Chughes10 said:
...I was charring a pine table top last night and to my dismay, I found that when I was done that the sides had warped upwards...
Sorry this happened but it really isn't too surprising. Yakisugi is a method to be practiced on...wood stock...not a finished product. If Yakisugi is applied to a finish piece the methods and techniques are much more refined and exactly to the overtly simplistic (and often incorrect methods) found on the internet and YouTube.

These methods can typically be found in all manner of application in Asia, both rustic and refined depending on application. After finding your pictures on the other post, it the apron assembly is stiff enough...you may...be able to pull the table back down without splitting it in half, which can happen in such cases where the tension in the wood is not uniform...

Chughes10 said:
I imagine this is from the heat of the torch shrinking the fibers on that side of the table, but now it wont lay flat without being clamped to my workbench. Is there a way to make it sit flat again? Maybe charring the underside?
Perhaps charring the opposite side may work for you, but it could just as easily make things much worse and render the table top unserviceable...

Charring is creating vast differentials in tension within the wood (as you have suspected)...very similar to issues in "case hardening" a piece of wood during Kiln Drying that too often takes place and isn't discovered until much later sometimes even years later after a piece is finished...

I would probably suggest adding oil (or water perhaps) to the cupped surface with dampened towels to get the piece to recover to a more original condition. Kerfing the bottom of the Table Top too can mitigate the curvature, and once relaxed (or partially relaxed) joined to the apron of the Table frame in such a fashion as to not arrest further movement by expansion contraction of the Table Top...
 

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Jay, couldn't get the link to work. Yakisagi? Does that come with egg roll and won ton soup? lol
 

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Hello Chughes10,

First, here is a link to more reading that you may find insightful...

焼き杉 Yakisugi



Sorry this happened but it really isn't too surprising. Yakisugi is a method to be practiced on...wood stock...not a finished product. If Yakisugi is applied to a finish piece the methods and techniques are much more refined and exactly to the overtly simplistic (and often incorrect methods) found on the internet and YouTube.

These methods can typically be found in all manner of application in Asia, both rustic and refined depending on application. After finding your pictures on the other post, it the apron assembly is stiff enough...you may...be able to pull the table back down without splitting it in half, which can happen in such cases where the tension in the wood is not uniform...



Perhaps charring the opposite side may work for you, but it could just as easily make things much worse and render the table top unserviceable...

Charring is creating vast differentials in tension within the wood (as you have suspected)...very similar to issues in "case hardening" a piece of wood during Kiln Drying that too often takes place and isn't discovered until much later sometimes even years later after a piece is finished...

I would probably suggest adding oil (or water perhaps) to the cupped surface with dampened towels to get the piece to recover to a more original condition. Kerfing the bottom of the Table Top too can mitigate the curvature, and once relaxed (or partially relaxed) joined to the apron of the Table frame in such a fashion as to not arrest further movement by expansion contraction of the Table Top...
I was just thinking about how I was going to throw a bunch of BLO layers on this table already, would that count as oil in the context you're talking about? Or should I put an excessive amount on there with the towel instead of wiping it off?
 
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