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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have build a 48" red oak, round pedestal table with 2 12" extensions. I am looking to build 6 chairs to go with it. I have never built chairs before. I have one design that was in Wood Magazine that looks OK, but I am not crazy about it. I'm looking for some pictures of chairs that some of you have made (nothing TOO fancy) and some recommendations of books or websites that are chair oriented. I have the tools, but no experience with chairs at this point.

Thanks for any ideas.
Don
 

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where's my table saw?
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Chairs are a pretty difficult build. It might be easier to buy some at one of these unfinished furniture companies. If you still want to build them you might post a picture of what style you have in mind so we can help you with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Lola Ranch very creative, beautiful designs.

I have attached a picture of the chair I am planning on building. It's alright, but lacks pizazz. What it has going for it is it is straight forward and I have complete plans for it, a very important consideration for a first time chair builder. I've built each piece in my head several times and have figured out the fixturing I am going to use to make it repeatable (6 times).

Comments appreciated.

Don

The picture is not too clear. The back is a 5" wide splat flanked by a 3/4" spoke on each side.
 

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Don,

That chair is put together almost exactly like mine but lacks any stretchers or a curved splats. Stretchers really add strength especially if someone rocks back onto two legs and I highly recommend adding some.

The angled corner blocks are a must IMHO.

You will be appreciated as a chair maker more if you build them comfortable to sit in. That is why I usually put a lumbar curve in the splats.

I believe It is most helpful to build a prototype chair to use as a pattern.

Bret
 

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Don,



You will be appreciated as a chair maker more if you build them comfortable to sit in. That is why I usually put a lumbar curve in the splats.

.

Bret
This is where the majority of chair makers fail whether it be dining chairs, upholstered chairs, the couch, the park bench or the seat in the car.

And speaking of car seats or any seat with springs; the designer often doesn't consider the person's weight when determining lumbar support position. I don't stay in those very long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Don,


You will be appreciated as a chair maker more if you build them comfortable to sit in. That is why I usually put a lumbar curve in the splats.

I believe It is most helpful to build a prototype chair to use as a pattern.

Bret
Bret,

I am planning to build a prototype and have purchased a 2"x12"x11' piece of ash for that purpose. Ash is relatively cheap around here because of emerald ash borers, and it looks nice enough to keep the chair if it turns out well.

The lumbar support is a good idea, but the thought of it causes me mental pain. I'm the kind of guy that can build almost anything given a set of plans, but as far a creative goes---not so much (read "not at all"). Changing the back leg and getting the curve to look natural would be a real task for me.

Do you steam, laminate or band saw the curve in the splat? How do you determine the correct amount of curvature for the lumbar support?

Don
 

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Bret,

I am planning to build a prototype and have purchased a 2"x12"x11' piece of ash for that purpose. Ash is relatively cheap around here because of emerald ash borers, and it looks nice enough to keep the chair if it turns out well.

The lumbar support is a good idea, but the thought of it causes me mental pain. I'm the kind of guy that can build almost anything given a set of plans, but as far a creative goes---not so much (read "not at all"). Changing the back leg and getting the curve to look natural would be a real task for me.

Do you steam, laminate or band saw the curve in the splat? How do you determine the correct amount of curvature for the lumbar support?

Don
I usually laminate thin strips and a curved form for the curved chair parts and sometimes I cut them to shape on the bandsaw. Just cut some shapes out of scrap wood, sit on a stool and have someone hold the shapes against your back until it feels right. You'll know when you have it right.

Bret
 

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If there is an old build thread someone could help me dig up of some of these chairs with a laminayed curved back splats I would be much obliged. I'm about to start a few dining chairs and hardly know where to start as far as comfort goes
 

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LolaRanch,

Mind telling the details of that last chair you posted, with the cantilever seat. Is the seat just attached in a mortice? Or is there some corbel type supports underneath the picture doesn't show? I wouldn't mind trying my hand at one of those if you wouldn't mind.

You do beautiful work, I'm always impressed with your work you post and appreciate it. :thumbsup:
 

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LolaRanch,

Mind telling the details of that last chair you posted, with the cantilever seat. Is the seat just attached in a mortice? Or is there some corbel type supports underneath the picture doesn't show? I wouldn't mind trying my hand at one of those if you wouldn't mind.

You do beautiful work, I'm always impressed with your work you post and appreciate it. :thumbsup:
George Nakashima's "Conoid Chair" was my inspiration for the cantilevered chair. You can copy my stuff all you want but on this on George gets the credit.

The seat is thick, 1-3/4", where it attaches to the legs by way of a double lap joint and then a very large screw through the back of the legs into the seat.

Wood Table Religious item Furniture Plywood


This detail photo exposes the imperfection of my joint which is none-the-less quite strong requiring no further re-enforcement.

Bret
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Bret,

I noticed on your walnut chairs you have a dado running around the inside of the seat. It looks rather narrow. Do the corner braces have a tenon that fits into that dado? Is it used just to ease the assembly process or is the corner brace glued into the dado for added strength?

Don
 

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Bret,

I noticed on your walnut chairs you have a dado running around the inside of the seat. It looks rather narrow. Do the corner braces have a tenon that fits into that dado? Is it used just to ease the assembly process or is the corner brace glued into the dado for added strength?

Don
You mean the dado in the rails beneath the seat? It's 1/4" x 1/4" held down 1/2" from the top edge. I use this to insert wooden cleats that hold the seat in place and allow for movement. And, yes, I do put a little tongue on the corner blocks to fit into the dado. In this case I held the corner blocks down a bit to allow for the folds in the upholstery.

Furniture Table Room Wood Chair


Bret
 
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