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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

Im trying to buy a chainsaw mill. I have contacted silvana (Canadian logsol dealer) but these guys are terrible at ordering and answering questions.

So i a planing to get the ms 660 stihl chansaw with a 36 inch bar. I know i need a ripping chain but is there also a special ripping bar or can a stock bar be used?

Also can someone recommend a 36 inch rpping chain/bar i can buy in canada or the US? Silvana told me they only stock upto a 24 inch and they will need to ship it from Europe.

Any help would be appreciated. Also i was thinking of buying the jig from lee valley. If anyone can recommend another better jig im open to suggestions.

Thanks,
Mike
 

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That is a big saw, a ripping chain will fit your bar. Oregon makes a ripping chain. I know you can get them in the U.S.
Good luck be safe an have fun

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I'm drooling when you say 660. Bailey's carries the ripping chain and should have 36" bars to fit your saw. I've never seen CSM at Lee Valley, but I could be wrong.

I know of several, the most noted is Alaska Saw Mill. I think Bailey's also sells that.
http://www.baileysonline.com/
 

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Baileysonline will make any chain you want. You definitely want a ripping chain, and probably two. They also have any length bar in several different quality and price points.

I have a ported 066 (older predecessor to the 660) with a 42" bar. Every time we pull that saw out, someone will say, "That's a MAN's saw!" They're right.

For running an Alaskan mill, we put an 036 on the other end, simply because those are the two largest saws I have.

For one powerhead, I'd run a .050 instead of a .063.
 

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I agree....check baileys they will have what you need. You won't be dissapionted with the 660.....I have one. Its a beast, be careful with it. It is a lot of saw, too bad I let someone borrow it and ran straight gas in it.....it now waits till I have time to rebuild it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for your help guys, i do not know much about chainsaws.

Can someone tell me which chain i should chose for a ms 660 36 inch bar? Also if i want 2 chain loops how many links do i order?

Looks like baileys sells by the link not by inch.

Thanks again,
Mike
 

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Call Bailey's and tell them what you have. Especially if you buy the bar from them. They'll tell you how many drive links and pitch of chain you'll need.

If you're new to handling a chainsaw I would highly recommend you also purchase (some where) safety equipment. Safety glasses are a must and a hardhat would probably be a good idea too. The fo;;owing thread made me a believer in the need for chaps:

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f26/simple-but-gruesome-reminder-please-57826/
 

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Chaps?? I don't mean to nag, I'm not your Mother, but just think of the proximety of the bar with respect to your legs when you're milling. If you are stradling the log while you're pushing the saw through the log and get a kick back...What's in the path of the saw bar?
 

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When I'm running a "Man's saw", I have on protective pants with built in Kevlar, under chaps.

I really wouldn't recommend anyone start learning to run a chainsaw with a 660. One of the best saw men I know-a big strong guy-got cut up pretty badly by an 044. He was a bit of a hotdog, but won't touch a saw now.
 

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IMO the 440 can be worse. Its a pipey sob and a good deal lighter. I tend to get a little complacent with it compared to my 066 and my fathers 088 because of the smaller size. But the first time of the day that i hang it up with full chisel skip chain she reminds me of whats up. Don't monkey around without chaps. I'm just as guilty as the next guy about thinking "it's just a quick job" but for a newcomer I'd insist. And take the time to get a pair that fit well.
 

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I have the same saw and like others have said. It's a beasty. I also run a chain mill with it. I bought the Alaskan from granberg and have been pretty happy with it. Here are a few things I have learned from the experience:

1. If I had seen the Alaskan before I bought it I would have made one myself. (I think anyone with a little fabrication skill could make one)

2. I have tried both the Bailey's rip chain and the Granberg chain that came with my mill. I like the Granberg one better. I mill mostly sycamore or oak around 30". The saw cuts fine but it's slow at that size. Bailey's chain seems to have too much grab for that size tree for me. The Granberg chain when sharp is faster to me. Too bad it's double the price.

3. Get a chain grinder or some quick way to sharpen your chains and get good at it. You'll need it. I usually head to the woods with 3 chains. By the time I've dulled them I've had all I can take work-wise. My loop is 151 links so hand filing sucks. Bought a grizzly grinder. Very happy now.

4. I recommend you get a double-end bar. This will give you the option of a helper handle or another power head. I am about to give another power head a shot because although the 66 has plenty of grunt in most cases, sometimes I feel like it needs more butt when working at the capacity of the bar.

5. As others have said, I cannot stress safety gear enough. I know you might feel like a dork with all that gear on but you'll feel like total idiot if you cut something off. These things crank our piles and piles of dust. You are turning a 1/4" board to dust on every pass. do your lungs a favor and get a good dust mask and hearing pro. Your saw will be running wide open for a little while. (not like limbing a tree).

6. Something that was sort of an afterthought to me was what to do with the lumber once milled. (I know this sounds stupid but I suspect others have had the same experience) Have a place ready to sticker and stack it. Have some anchor seal or some way to seal the ends of the boards. Have some help ready to move that stuff. Have a way to cover it and keep it out of the weather. It would suck to break your back for the lumber only to ruin it in the drying process.

7. I can't think of anything else so I'll quit. LOL.

K.
 
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