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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter #1
So as you may have seen in another thread....I'm building a router table. Roughly 40 inches high....34 wide and 24 deep. My shops compact, so mobility is a must. Also, it's a concrete floor, but it's not perfectly flat so many of my tools on mobile bases wobble a bit.

Obviously not ideal for a router table, so I'm looking for ideas. Here's my current thoughts...

1. Use 3 casters, thus making it tripod and not wobble. However to deal with potential tipping, install leveling feet on the corners where the single caster is to be able to stabilize it.

2. Utilize some sort of spring loaded caster.....but wow they're pricy.

Or......your thoughts??
 

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Do a search on self made mobile bases or the like. I've seen where people have used regular casters that can be hinged up/down to give more stability when in use.
 

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I had a problem with some rollers. I could never seem to adjust the feet to get them stable. I then saw these self levelling feet at Lee Valley. Not expensive, replaced all the feet in my two rollers. Now they sit without wobbling.

http://www.leevalley.com/US/Hardware/page.aspx?p=70815&cat=3,40993,41283&ap=1

Consider two casters and two of these feet, just may need handles or use the top to lift onto the two casters. I have to lift my router table to get it onto the two casters on the one side.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter #4
Here's an interesting idea....it doesn't really fix the tippy problem....but it would work for other places. Funny how simple some things can be
 

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Just put two casters on one end. To move, you tip it up like a wheel barrow. Either of the flat feet can receive a shim if you set it in an uneven area. You only need non movable and non locking casters which are inexpensive.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter #6
I thought about that option, but the same problem remains that I'll need a shim to keep it from wobbling. And further, I plan on building in storage underneath so too far of tipping will mess up the storage. I'm convinced I can come up with a leveling solution....there's gotta be one out there.....
 

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Ryan,

The single pivot "foot" you posted, along with the non-swivel casters should make the table non-tippy, unless you are really pushing on it. Put the two casters in the back, and the pivot foot in front. Then some fold out handles to be able to move it wheelbarrow style and roll it into place. The back feet will keep it from tipping side-to-side, and the front pivot triangulates the base, so you get the three point stability.
 

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I made mine work like a wheelbarrow. On one end 3 fixed casters are bolted to the bottom of the cabinet, just inside the side panel. They are sized so that they are about 1/4" short of hitting the floor when the cabinet sits. That side of the cabinet has a taper cut in it (see photo). On the other side are some handles I installed. They drop down when not in use. To move the cabinet I pick up on the handles, then tilt it toward that taper until the wheels touch....after that you're moving like a wheelbarrow. To get the handles to work I had to mount them on a pivot, then run a chain down from the end of the handle to the bottom of the cabinet. (no pics, but I could one if needed). The nice thing about this is that the cabinet is rock solid when sitting, it's square on three of the 4 cabinet sides.

 

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@Ryan - I will take a pic and post it later. On my planer cart, I attached a block of hardwood to each corner. The block had a hole drilled through it with t nut and 3/8 inch bolt. A home made leveler. I have the same problem in my garage - very uneven floor.
 

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TVman:
Here's some pics of my handle setup. Notice the block the whole rigamaroll is bolted to. The second pic shows one of the handles propped up with a piece of MDF. The purpose of the turnbuckles is just to give me some adjustment in how high the handles raised up.



 
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