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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm not a casework person, don't often work with ply, unless it is for veneer work in special furniture pieces. So, in short, not enjoying this job, but will be interested in comments from folks who are casework specialists. It is not my forte.

Start of with a parametric 3D drawing/assembly.



Following the drawings, build the base first and cut all the ply pieces at once, using the ruler on my table saw which is precise.



Use an old Oldham Dado stack and cut all the rabbets and dados for the bottom case ply parts. The dado cuts clean and accurate, I dial in with shims to around 0.002", based on the average ply thickness measured in a few places. Calibrate my ruler on the table saw fence to be accurate to the dado stack and again use only the table saw to measure.

The case bottom, top, dividers and sides are glued together, they fit like a glove, no fasteners needed, a few clamps. case shown below, after glue-up with preparation work starting for the face-frame.



Start with the face-frame M&T. To be accurate, I use a pencil for rough cuts, then an Exacto knife to mark precise cuts and mark out my mortises. The face frame is measured directly off the case and the first tenon cuts are done on the table saw, using a standard combo blade. I also use a Starret combination square.





Mortises are cut on a hollow chisel mortiser and the tenons are cut partly on the table saw using a Shop-Fox jig, then to the bandsaw.





The face frame is fitted together dry using a light tap fit with a mallet and then placed on the case, everything fits, I'm out 1/64 over on one corner, no big deal.





Face frame is glued to the case using lots of clamps and as a next step the filing drawer sides and fronts are milled. Still no screws, brads, or nails.



So far the case is solid as a rock, I have the back ready, but will fit that after I have fitted the drawers rolling out shelf and door, so I can get into the back if needed. Will be interested to know if those who fit Blum hinges and Accuride slides need access to the back of the cabinet, or do they do everything from the front?

More later.

PS. Interesting figure on the left case divider, there was a head as well, but it got cut off.
 

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I see a knobbie in the background. I'll be watching this one for another glimpse of the bike, and of course the awesome looking desk!
 

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where's my table saw?
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quick question

I see you used 2 tools to make the tenons, table saw and tenon jig AND the bandsaw saw using the fence. I recently made some half laps using only the bandsaw as shown below. I found it to be accurate enough for those, just wondering if you have ever tried it on tenons and what was your result? :blink:



 

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Discussion Starter #5
I see you used 2 tools to make the tenons, table saw and tenon jig AND the bandsaw saw using the fence. I recently made some half laps using only the bandsaw as shown below. I found it to be accurate enough for those, just wondering if you have ever tried it on tenons and what was your result? :blink:
Bill, because I use a hollow chisel mortiser, (hate it but it goes with the style of most of my pieces) I like my fit to be on the tighter side and need accuracy of between 0.001" - 003". I have not been able to achieve that with a bandsaw, or a dado blade.

I use a combo blade and cut the shoulders first using my table saw miter gauge and purposely don't cut the full depth of the shoulder; trim that later with a bench chisel. I size my tenon so that the same cuts work for both the structural and cosmetic shoulders. I then cut the faces using a tenon jig creeping up with micro adjustments until I get a snug fit and then use this setting to finish all my faces. I do the edges on the bandsaw and always oversize slightly. I then fit each tenon to the mortise using a bench chisel with a micro bevel on the back (Great for a 0.001" planing cut) to trim the edges to exactly fit the mortise and to also trim the areas close to the shoulders to clean that up. Sounds like a lot of work, but it actually goes fast once set up.

Thanks for posting.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Why 2 different grain directions on the sides/dividers? :huh:
LOL, I wondered if someone was going to notice that.

The grain on the sides run vertical, but on the dividers inside the case the grain runs horizontal. The side panels are Cherry, the insides of the case are Maple and I tried to utilize every part of my 4' x 8' Maple sheets without wastage. As this is inside the cabinet, it should be OK. Unless a drawer is removed, it should not be noticed.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Another night and another Dollar

Drawers are done, doing the door and the drawer fronts, pics shows how measured off the case. To the casework experts, what is the smallest gap I can get away with between drawers and face frame, same for the door, using high quality concealed hinges and slides? Don't want inset problems later.

 

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Discussion Starter #9
Another question, fit the hinges and slides after finishing, or fit them before, remove, spray and re-fit?
 
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