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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A buddy of mine has a small fleet of canoes and kayaks. After a trip to the Boundary Waters he brought his canoe back with of about 6" of the gunwale broken off one side of the bow at the very front. The gunwale seems to be white oak so I cut it off square beyond the break and made a replacement piece.

This piece is about 3/4"x1" in section and has two SS screws through it but was also glued on. The canoe is Kevlar or some such thing thing but the outside of the hull is clear resin.

What waterproof glue would be good to attach the strip of white oak gunwale to the resin hull? Epoxy maybe?

Thanks,
Bill
 

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I would recommend epoxy resin. I built a canoe years ago and used epoxy resin from System Three (I left it out in the weather for years). Used it on the hull with fiberglass, gunwales, and end caps. Also have a friend that fixed a 30 ft sailboat deck to hull separation with it. It's relatively easy to find these days in a variety of kit sizes (Woodcraft sells it). It sticks to wood great, can gap fill ( you can add sawdust, wood flour...etc...). If overlapping existing resin just make sure it's very clean and it will provide a watertight superstrong bond. Make sure you measure accurately. Stay away from polyester resin.
System Three T-88 High performance Epoxy, 1/2 Pint Kit: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific
http://members.tripod.com/c22_fleet_6/epoxy-vs-polyester.html
 

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For the US readers, Araldite is a UK brand of epoxy.

An epoxy is going to be the best adhesive for this application.

+1 on the System Three. Another good brand in US is the West System.
 

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Hi Bill make that 4 votes for a epoxy.
Just a heads up the joint that is used on a gunwale is a scarf, with the forward piece of the gunwale having the shortest part of the scarf on the inboard side and the longest part on the outboard side.

If a craft runs on to the gunwale square on it stands a good chance of staving the side of the boat in,a square but joint has no strength behind it.:thumbsup: Billy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
First, thanks to everyone for the recommendation of epoxy. Plus, now I know what epoxy is called in the UK!

Billy - I see your point about a scarf joint vs. a butt joint. However, to do a scarf joint I would have to unscrew and un-glue the remaining gunwale all along the upper edge of the hull. You can understand why I don't want to go through all that. Since the damage is within 6" of the bow, I don't think there's as much of a strength problem than if the joint was more toward the middle of the canoe. Plus, I'll sink screws on both ends of the gunwale strip adjacent to the joint.

I can sure see the advantage in strength of a scarf joint over a butt joint, though.

Bill
 

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Bill may be I`m not picturing this right but surly the after part of the gunwale could be left in place while the scarf is formed on it.A template made and a new piece formed for the forward part of the gunwale,but your the guy at the sharp end. Billy
 

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>>>> Hi Bill make that 4 votes for a epoxy.

Check that with the epoxy formulator. In my younger years, I did lots of boat work. Using epoxy for an exterior application required that it be over coated with a UV containing exterior varnish. The UV in sunlight will attack epoxy causing it to become cloudy and then crack and peel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Well, my buddy the canoe owner didn't want to use epoxy. He was afraid the attachment would become too permanent if he would need to replace a piece of gunwale again. So I just used Titebond 3.

After looking at the canoe today, I don't think there will be a strength problem with the butt joint. The broken piece (outwale) is backed up by an inwale. I'm just learning boating terms but I believe these two pieces are considered the gunnel? Anyway, where the repair is the pieces are backed up by a small triangular deck.

Here's a pic:


You can't see the butt joint as it's behind the right clamp.

My buddy is going to finish the repair by sanding and rounding that 'nose' at the tip and varnishing.

Bill
 

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Way to go Bill as said your the guy at the sharp end BTW widening your boat terminology the triangle piece is called the breast hook.:thumbsup:
 

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I have enjoyed this bit on boat building. I hope to refurbish a UK very small dinghy. ( Prout Puffin). It stood on its side beside my house for 35 years and outside my sons for a further 8. If can be saved will document the restoration and post on here.
johnep
 
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