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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just the other day, I purchased my Steel City 14" Granite Deluxe Bandsaw, and I have been quite enamored with it. *Today, however, I ran into a problem - with it - that I just can't seem to counter. *I had desired to try my hand at a bandsaw puzzle box, and set in to cutting out the perimeter of the design in some pine that I had laminated into a nice sized rectangular shape. *About a quarter of the way through my first rip, there was a binding of the blade. *It took better than a half hour to get the blade released, and that also entailed, first, having to remove the blade entirely from the bandsaw. *After freeing the blade from the stock I found that I could not reinstall it on the saw. *I made a call to a tech, at Steel City, who did try to walk me through some things I could try, but it was all to no avail. *Nothing I attempted proved to me enabling, in my quest to lower the upper wheel enough to allow for reinstallation of the blade. *

Of course, my saw is under warranty, but I don't know how they might try to work things out for me. *The unit is much too heavy for me to try and take to a service center, and I am hoping that they would authorize a local tool repair company to come out to my home. *But, has any one else ever experienced such as what I am presently dealing with? *If so, how did you correct the condition?
 

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where's my table saw?
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the upper wheel is the movable one

You must first see if it is free to move vertically and not stuck as I have experienced. The adjustment knob must be turned CCW I believe, to release the tension and lower the wheel. Grasp the wheel and see if will slide up and down freely. It should, if not that's your issue. That's the first step and it should be the last, if all is well. You may have the quick release blade tensioning lever, I don't know you didn't mention it. That's a whole 'nother issue.

A photo of the blade release assembly and adjustment knob would help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You must first see if it is free to move vertically and not stuck as I have experienced. The adjustment knob must be turned CCW I believe, to release the tension and lower the wheel. Grasp the wheel and see if will slide up and down freely. It should, if not that's your issue. That's the first step and it should be the last, if all is well. You may have the quick release blade tensioning lever, I don't know you didn't mention it. That's a whole 'nother issue.

A photo of the blade release assembly and adjustment knob would help.
Thanks much, for such a prompt response. I will try to get a photo up when I get on my computer, later on today. But my unit DOES have a quick release tensioning lever, which IS in its de-tensioned position. Regardless of what action I try to put forth, I absolutely cannot get that upper wheel to move not even in the slightest. I am starting to get a bit worried over the matter.
 

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where's my table saw?
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It sounds like the detensioner ...isn't

I suspect that's the culprit. It's a cam operated device, where the lever movement moves the wheel assembly up against the spring's resistance. Somethin' ain't workin' right with that unit.

looks like this?


or this:


or this?



You didn't read this here, but a sharp whack with a dead blow hammer should jar the sliding portion loose if it's wedged.....
don't beat on it in a place that may crack off. Just a quick rap and the spring should take over if it's stuck.
 

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The tension block is likely jammed. It's the white metal part with the coil spring inside. The small knob on it controls the pitch of the top wheel, you loosen or tighten that to get the blade running on the wheels correctly. When using the bandsaw, make straight in relief cuts at key points. This will keep the blade from binding and you won't have to back out of tight curves or other cuts or put pressure on the blade to make cuts. You should be able to let go of your work anytime while bandsawing and not have the work move. Beginners almost always put too much side pressure on the blades, trying to get back to or keep on their lines. If you are using the saw correctly, the blade shouldn't touch the side guide blocks or bearings when cutting. Takes some practice.
 

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The tension block is likely jammed. It's the white metal part with the coil spring inside. The small knob on it controls the pitch of the top wheel, you loosen or tighten that to get the blade running on the wheels correctly. When using the bandsaw, make straight in relief cuts at key points. This will keep the blade from binding and you won't have to back out of tight curves or other cuts or put pressure on the blade to make cuts. You should be able to let go of your work anytime while bandsawing and not have the work move. Beginners almost always put too much side pressure on the blades, trying to get back to or keep on their lines. If you are using the saw correctly, the blade shouldn't touch the side guide blocks or bearings when cutting. Takes some practice.
+1. :yes: I don't know the particulars of that specific saw, but there are a few things to try. There should be a locking nut of some sort that locks the vertical travel of the wheel. Your tension adjuster could be not releasing. The vertical adjusting knob may not be turning the shaft that moves the wheel.

Worst case scenario, would be to remove the wheel to determine the problem. But if you do that, you will be removing the leverage you have with the wheel being there.

There are a few tips for operation that may help in the future. Your blade width should be narrow enough to make tight curves. Many blades that are supplied with a new saw (if any) are likely too wide for that.

The upper blade guide should be adjusted as close to the top of the stock as possible. That helps to keep the blade positioned properly.






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After you make sure that the lever and spring are detensioned, Walk the blade onto the wheel. Have the blade on the bottom wheel and lets say you can only get to the eleven oclock position on the upper wheel. Hold your finger on the blade at 11 oclock and turn the wheel until your finger is at 1 oclock and the blade will pop on.
 

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After you make sure that the lever and spring are detensioned, Walk the blade onto the wheel. Have the blade on the bottom wheel and lets say you can only get to the eleven oclock position on the upper wheel. Hold your finger on the blade at 11 oclock and turn the wheel until your finger is at 1 oclock and the blade will pop on.
Not to be disagreeable but if you have to walk the blade on, there is something wrong. Blade could be too short, or the upper wheel tensioning device isn't completely releasing. Don't ever use your fingers, you won't soon forget what it's like to get pinched under a tight blade. Same with stepped pulleys. If you have to do it, use a block but look for the proper solution first. A too tight blade can cause other problems and a stuck tensioner might suddenly release.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks to everyone, for all the replies.

I have attached a photo of the rear side of my saw, as per the request of one of the responders. It seems to me, also, that the most likely culprit for my dilemma is a component of the tensioning knob. I went back down to my shop, today, to see if I could think of trying something that (maybe) I hadn't, yesterday. But all was to no avail. I will try a few good taps with my dead-blow hammer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Finding a PDF manual for my saw, I copied two images from it to post here. The one shows (a bit clearer than my previous photo) the tension release lever. The other illustrates the tensioning scale.

I just went into the shop for the purpose of giving the concerned elements a good whack, or two, with my dead-blow hammer. But it changed nothing, and I am more or less resigned, now, to the high probability of there having been some type of manufacturer's defect with my saw.

I guess it is just a matter of waiting to see how Steel City chooses to handle things.

PS: In the first photo (left side) the letter 'D' designates the tension release lever. It is ON in its far left travel, and OFF at far right.
 

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where's my table saw?
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there is a fine and gross adjustment.

The gross adjustment is accomplished with the de tensioning lever, the fine adjustment is the long vertical shaft coming out of the sliding block in the second photo.
If you back out the threaded shaft until it no longer bears against the black block of the de tensioning lever .... the wheel should have no restriction from sliding up and down. If it doesn't, it is jambed, probably twisted in the sliding grooves. It if remains in place after the shaft has cleared the block it, rap it downward and see if that frees it.
There should be either 2 or 4 bolts on the inside, behind the wheel that attaches the mount for the sliding piece. It could be they are too tight and causing the sliding piece to bind up. Loosen them slightly and see if that frees it up.

In general... machinery diagnosis over the web is "iffy" at best, even with the best of intentions. These are just simple machined parts, not rotating stuff, and it should be easy to find the cause of the seizure. Good luck.
 

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Make sure that you have completely loosened the tension knob so that the spring is completely relaxed and that the lever is in the released position. I not talking about just taking the scale down to the smallest blade size, I mean totally loosen it as far as it will go without removing the shaft from the tensioning block. I find that with my saw if I don't do those two things I can not get the blade on.

Another thing to check is if the blade got bent when you had to work it out of the piece you were cutting. A bent blade will never go on the saw properly again and should be thrown away rather than reused.
 

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good advice

Also make certain the blade guides are backed away from the sides and the rear edge of the blade, so it's not hanging up on any part of the machine which will not allow it to get back on the wheels,

One of the rear blade guides could have shifted forward and that will stop the blade from centering on the wheels. Remove your insert from the table also to help see whats going on. This is a different issue that the tensioning device you mentioned, but let's account for all the possibilities. :yes:

Finally, unplug the machine while all this is attempted. :eek:
 

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More Advice

Your saw may have a check stop, that is set after the wheel is adjusted up to tighten the blade. It would be a stop that keeps the wheel from moving down. It could be something as simple as a set screw. If it has that, all your loosening will be worthless.

Another tip would be to use your tracking adjustment (the one that tips the wheel side to side to center the blade on the tire). If you can, tip it towards you as far as it will go. That will lower the edge of the wheel maybe enough to get the blade to slip on.






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Thanks to everyone, for all the replies.

I have attached a photo of the rear side of my saw, as per the request of one of the responders. It seems to me, also, that the most likely culprit for my dilemma is a component of the tensioning knob. I went back down to my shop, today, to see if I could think of trying something that (maybe) I hadn't, yesterday. But all was to no avail. I will try a few good taps with my dead-blow hammer.
why don't you turn the know to tighten the blade even tho the blade isn't on their, now does the wheel go up keep going tell i guess it won't go up any more, now turn in the tention know in the down turn and see if the wheel come's down with you pulling on the wheel as you lossen the knob ?? if it does keep turning tell it will now come down any more ? now this should be smooth up and down , do this a couple time's in the down position the blade will go on the saw at this time? if this blade doesn't go on , wrong blade? but if it were on before that it will go on again, the top wheel isn't comming down to the bottom, do like i mention at the top, and i bet you will get it back on , it the top wheel stop's at some point on the down ward move than that is where the problum is something stuck in their ?? if it stop at a point than you had a to take it apart and see what the the problum ?? good luck
 

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If you compare the photo of your saw and the photo of the saw in the pdf manual, you will see that the sliding block on your saw is about 3/8" to 1/2" HIGHER than the one in the pdf photo. The upper wheel is attached to that block so no wonder the blade wont go on. Bring that block down to where it is in the manual and the blade will go on.
 

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exactly

If you compare the photo of your saw and the photo of the saw in the pdf manual, you will see that the sliding block on your saw is about 3/8" to 1/2" HIGHER than the one in the pdf photo. The upper wheel is attached to that block so no wonder the blade wont go on. Bring that block down to where it is in the manual and the blade will go on.
See post 12 above.
I mentioned about the fine and gross adjustments above. It looks as if the fine adjustment, the long vertical shaft with the blade knob on top, is NOT loosened or backed up far enough. Your sliding white metal block is WAY too high and is being prevented from lowering by the fine adjustment shaft. Simple, really :yes: ... Photos help so much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
If you compare the photo of your saw and the photo of the saw in the pdf manual, you will see that the sliding block on your saw is about 3/8" to 1/2" HIGHER than the one in the pdf photo. The upper wheel is attached to that block so no wonder the blade wont go on. Bring that block down to where it is in the manual and the blade will go on.
I am SO glad that your eyes saw what they did. I had looked at that block a good number of times - trying to understand how it's functioning was supposed to work. That was because I could not see how that part could move. To me, it really appeared that this part was sitting DIRECTLY on the left and right ends of that cast frame. I hadn't been able to see that this piece was a 'slider'. It still wasn't clearly seen, but the difference in the photos (just as you stated) revealed it all. Yesterday, I had taken my dead-blow hammer to the upper wheel, and certain other elements - but not to this slider. Just a moment ago, I took that hammer to the top of that sliding block and - sure enough - I could see downward movement. Now, why I had to do that - to get the slider down - is something I do not know. And it is a concern that I will have addressed. But I am now back in stroke. I have my sidekick back :smile:.

Again, I thank everyone for their support, and effort to try and help me conquer what was going on.
 
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