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Ok, am building various units with pine and am needing to paint plain white - doesn't need to be high gloss or anything, but just want a nice smooth solid white with no grain finish.

I just cannot seem to achieve this, am getting more and more complex just trying to get rid of them, but clearly am missing something, here's what I'm currently doing:

- sand down wood surface with 280gsm
- apply rustin's wood grain filler
- 4 coats of white primer (light sand between each)
- 3 coats paint with white paint
- 3 coats varnish

But I can still see the grain!

Am I being daft??
 

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Scotty D
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Pine has hard and soft grain. If you are not using a hardwood block when sanding it will dish the soft grain and it will show in the finish.

There should be no need for a grain filler on Pine.

280x is too fine in my opinion. I sand Pine to 120/150. :smile:
 

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When you sanded the wood to begin with did you use a finish sander or orbital sander? A finish sander will often take away the soft parts of the wood making the harder grain show up. Grain filler won't help on a tight grain wood like pine. Using primer sanding between coats with a orbital sander is the best way to level the surface on pine wood. The problem with the grain really needed to be fixed before you started putting your color coat on. It can still be fixed but will take a lot of additional work. I really need to know specifically what the last coat was.

If you used an oil based varnish over the paint the white paint will eventually turn yellow as the varnish will yellow. If your clear is a water based polyurethane you will be alright with the clearcoat. It won't yellow.
 

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Pine is not the best choice for doing what you seem to want to do. The grain will always telegraph into the final finish unless you use a very thick finish like epoxy. A much better choice would have been a wood like poplar or soft maple.
 
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