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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am toying with the idea of sanding down this table to smooth out the top and attempting to stain it a single color in hopes to achieve a more uniform look. The description only states that is was made from solid pine. Can anyone share any potential "gotchas" I could run into in my attempt on this project?

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Plank Hardwood


 

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David - Machinist in wood
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You can stain it with one color but that doesn't mean it will end up all one color. The different cuts of wood will soak up the stain differently and will be light/dark almost guaranteed. You can use toner in the finish coat if you're spraying and achieve a fairly uniform color, though.
 

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You can stain it with one color but that doesn't mean it will end up all one color. The different cuts of wood will soak up the stain differently and will be light/dark almost guaranteed. You can use toner in the finish coat if you're spraying and achieve a fairly uniform color, though.
David, thank you for your response. Forgive the novice question here, but if the table is made up solely of pine, what is giving the various colors in the original finish? I was under the impression the multiple pieces were stained differently to achieve the pictured look.
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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David, thank you for your response. Forgive the novice question here, but if the table is made up solely of pine, what is giving the various colors in the original finish? I was under the impression the multiple pieces were stained differently to achieve the pictured look.
The various colors come from the different densities and cuts of the Pine used in the piece. Pine is difficult to stain if you're wanting uniformity because it goes light/dark all in one board and from one board to the next, unless that's the look you're going for and in that case it's easy to stain. If you're looking for a consistent color then Pine is one of the worst choices but that can be overcome with toner in the lacquer finish.
 

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Pine is very difficult to achieve a stain finish. some pieces are more porous and will splotch, others will not take stain. That finish is a sprayed finish with color added to it, not stain. You can use all the preconditioners you wish but it will not stain evenly or uniformly. I have seen cabinet doors of "soft maple" splotch when stained.
 

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I am toying with the idea of sanding down this table to smooth out the top and attempting to stain it a single color in hopes to achieve a more uniform look. The description only states that is was made from solid pine. Can anyone share any potential "gotchas" I could run into in my attempt on this project?

View attachment 442906

You can refinish it however any refinishing project should start with chemically removing the finish. The finish penetrates into the wood and sanding tends to remove what is on the surface and leaves what is penetrated into the wood. Then when you start trying to stain the wood again there is places that don't accept the stain because the old finish is in the wood.

The way to get a more uniform color on pine is to use a wood conditioner. There is hard and soft places in the wood which accept the stain unevenly. The wood conditioner is a sealer which makes the hard and soft places more even so it stains more even. I would recommend getting some pine from a local lumber company to practice the finish on. Sand the lumber the same as the project so you can expect the same results. Since the wood conditioner is a sealer you may need to thin it a little for the stain to take or you may have to use a darker color stain than you think. What I like for a wood conditioner is a 50/50 mixture of boiled linseed oil and mineral spirits and allow it to dry before staining.
 

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The Nut in the Cellar
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I wonder what that table top is really made from, perhaps some rustic plywood? In the picture the grain is continuous along what is supposed to be the ends of the boards!
For the $$$$ this table is listed for and how the pictures look, I really wonder what it is. The only way to remove the factory finish for refinishing would be professional stripping. I would be willing to bet the result would be most disappointing for what it cost. The way the grain runs in the pictures makes me think of appliqués, not real wood grain. Ben Napier of the Home Town show calls the technique "pictures of wood". The description "solid wood" doesn't necessarily mean what it implies. It could be made of plywood or MDF for all we know from the descriptions. Never thought much of the "shabby chic" style anyway.
 

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I am toying with the idea of sanding down this table to smooth out the top and attempting to stain it a single color in hopes to achieve a more uniform look. The description only states that is was made from solid pine. Can anyone share any potential "gotchas" I could run into in my attempt on this project?

View attachment 442906

I would sand it first and then decide what to do next.
 
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