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Discussion Starter #1
I decided to pull out my book from several decades ago and bone up on the art of kitchen cabinet making. Since I will start our kitchen remodel this coming year, I figured I better read up. Last thing I want to do is get backed into a corner :eek: And that just might happen when I build the corner sink base. That is the whole purpose of the remodel - fix the faucet leak once and for all! :) ...and she hates the 90 deg corner sink.

Cabinetmaking and Millwork By John L. Feirer, circa 1967. This was my dad's book and he passed it on to me back in the 70's. For most of the last decade or two it has sat on the book shelf.

Note: This book covers just about every aspect of cabinetmaking you could think of.

Kitchen Cabinets - page 728.
 

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Uncle Fester
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The book will give you a lot basic principals in techniques but remember a lot has changed since the book was published.
If you are building kitchen cabinets take a look at Sommerfelds videos with his router bits for building cabinets. It's a fast and simple solution.
 

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Bought the same book back in 67 when I was starting in the trade. Still an excellent reference. You won't find pocket hole screw construction in it. You did an excellent job on the green cabinet, you shouldn't have any problems with the kitchen. You don't have to build small individual cabinets and screw them together like they do with manufactured cabinets but that's OK if you are comfortable with that technique.

Corner sinks can free up a lot of counter space in a small kitchen but you can always move the plumbing and put the sink in a different place. Most normal dishwashers require a 24" opening but other appliances like range and ref can be many different sizes than they used to be. Plan ahead.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The good thing is I am not going into this cabinet building venture green. I just figured the reading would do me some good.

My "workshop" shares the floor space with a washer/dryer/hot water heater/upright freezer and some storage shelves, all in a one car garage. :-( So, sayng that, all of my tools are on mobile bases or casters. I try to plan my workflow and setup for it, then move on to the next task.

Building cabinets is a one-cabinet-at-a-time affair for me. That is why I build the face frames first, then the carcases. I loosely follow the workflow of
. That worked out really well for me on the buffet. I don't see any reason to change. One thing that helps is the lumber yard will cut the sheet goods to a manageable size - either rip or cross cut. That really helps when I get them home...and saves a little time also. Typically, I have them ripped in half or cross cut on the 32 inch mark. Much more manageable and they don't charge extra.
 

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Uncle Fester
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cabinetman said:
What would that be? .
I should have expanded on my post. I gave the Sommerfelds router table technique as one example for building cabinets that probably did not exist in 1967. Pocket screw joinery for face frames is part of the system. I did not own a router table back then
Also if you're doing a complete remodel, cabinet design and finishes have come a long way since then. The book probably refers to plastic laminate as the latest and greatest. Lot of new materials for counters that didn't exist back then.
All I'm saying if you're following the design standards of 1967, you may end up with a brand new 50 year old dated looking kitchen.

Explore some new thoughts of the cabinet design or look and look for details to support the design.
 

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Old School
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I should have expanded on my post. I gave the Sommerfelds router table technique as one example for building cabinets that probably did not exist in 1967. Pocket screw joinery for face frames is part of the system. I did not own a router table back then
Also if you're doing a complete remodel, cabinet design and finishes have come a long way since then. The book probably refers to plastic laminate as the latest and greatest. Lot of new materials for counters that didn't exist back then.
All I'm saying if you're following the design standards of 1967, you may end up with a brand new 50 year old dated looking kitchen.

Explore some new thoughts of the cabinet design or look and look for details to support the design.

I have to admit that I don't have that book, but, the principles set forth are likely still the forerunner of fabrication techniques. Quality construction hasn't changed since then. Custom cabinetry is still done like it was in the 60's and 70's. If you are following the design standards of 1967, the basic cabinet construction can be the same. No difference in that. Raised panel doors are the same, so basically there's no real difference.

If you are using face frames, you are still stuck in the 60's and 70's. No real need for them, as the little strength they afford isn't worth the expense of materials, and the time involved. For the most part, cabinets today use euro hinges, and the doors cover the face frame almost completely. If you allow visible reveals so the face frame shows, and are using some decorative butt hinges, again, that's back to the 60's and 70's.

Router tables were used back then and jigs were shop made. All routing and router profiling was done with single speed routers, and with fixed bases. Soft start, plunge, and variable speed wasn't available yet. There weren't any "door suppliers" then. Shops made their own.

Pocket screws and biscuits when introduced to the market appealed to those wanting a faster method for assembly. IMO, traditional joinery used back then was and still is superior to PH joinery.

Plastic laminate was a popular material back then, and it still is. It's made the same way, and applied the same way. Of course there are new color and pattern selections.

There has been the introduction to the market some "goodies" that have their own appeal. Jigs, fences and gauges in pretty anodized blue or gold are intended to improve accuracy. Using a CAD system does provide some very realistic looking pictures. I can't deny that. But, they aren't a necessity. Money can be spent on those things, but, when it gets back to basics, the craft is still up to the craftsman.






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Some of the best info that I have seen in recent years was in the Oct/Nov 2012 issue of American Woodworker. It consists of a sderies of articles on building a kitchen by the New England School of Architectural Woodworking. The articles do a good job of simplifying procedures to make them approachable.
 

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I have this book, and I've found it to be helpful (good visual examples).

 

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Discussion Starter #15
I read through the cabinetmaking section and several other sections. Got a little insite and made a few notes. Actually I copied the page and printed it out for future reference. I sure wish I knew how to use Sketchup. About all I can do is rotate and zoom in and out. From there it goes downhill fast.
 
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