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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys looking for advice on refinishing kitchen cabinets. Right now there a golden oak with probably lacquer. Looking to go to an antique white finish.

I'd like to get that smooth seamless finish like on woodmode cabinets that looks just so darn perfect.

What is the best process to prep cabinets for finishing? Clean and use a liquid sandpaper?

Then what is the best method for applying new color and clear? Looking for sprayble products, Sherwin Williams preferably because of discount.

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Unless you grain fill, you're gonna have a lot of wood grain showing. Filling, sanding, priming, and painting a complete kitchen is gonna be a boat load of work. Not being a nay sayer, just being honest.
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Antique white finish could mean a lot of different things. Can you post a picture of what you have in mind? If it's just white paint with a faux finish on it you could go ahead and do it. If it needs to be actually refinished you would be better off waiting until warm weather.
 

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a finish like this?

I made this corner cabinet for my son's bathroom. The finish is Min Wax Pickled White with clear Polycrylic over top.




If your cabinets are in good shape I think all you will need to do is clean off any residue with a solvent that won't attack the lacquer, seal them and them apply your white finish. By antique do you mean "artificially" antique OR just like the finish above?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This is what I have in mind. It's a project for my mom, not sure what her expectations are with the grain being visible or if she's wanting smooth.

What professional products are you guys using to reach a finish like wood mode? Lacquer paint is what I was thinking they use

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That is just a solid color. Assuming from your description the wood is an open grain wood like oak in order to get a smooth finish the grain will need to be filled. If it is a lacquer finish this could be done with lacquer primer. My Sherwin Williams sells a lacquer primer called Bushwacker white lacquer undercoater. Probably two coats sanding between coats you get the finish level enough to paint. Once primed you can use any topcoat. It doesn't have to be lacquer.

The first thing you need to do though is a thorough cleaning. Just from cooking the cabinets are covered with oil. I normally wash cabinets down with Krud Kutter Gloss Off. Then scuff sand the existing finish with 220 or finer grit paper and it should be ready to prime. After the first coat of primer try to sand the majority of it off. The idea is for the primer to fill the grain and smooth the finish. The second coat you should just need to make it smooth. If the texture of the wood is still visible you may have to sand most of it off and put a third coat of primer on.
 

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Yeah. Clean your old cabinets. Take an air pig bast out remaining dust bunnies. Tape off and apply sherwin Williams primer let that dry then sand with 220 and air blast and tack cloth . Then either spray or paint on the antique white apply two coats over a 48 hour period . . Oak has grain but it looks sexy showing through the paint film.

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Discussion Starter #9
So what products have you guys used that gave excellent results? What else should I steer clear of also.

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I did my parents oak kitchen this past summer. Did tons of sanding, 2 coats primer and 4 coats lacquer and grain still shows but I like that look. I used all wb products....ml campbell agualente that was tinted to the BM colour my mom wanted. Sprayed great right out of the can. 3 coats of the tinted followed by 1 coat of clear.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
That looks really nice, definitely a lot of sanding and taping with this type of work. I was hoping to use water based to keep odor to a minimum, any issues on adhesion?

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If you are wanting to go with water based there is issues with adhesion going over an existing finish. You might scuff sand the existing finish and coat the existing finish with Zinsser Sealcoat and then a white primer. If the cabinets have a lacquer finish you could also scuff sand the finish and coat them with a white lacquer primer. Both the sealcoat and the lacquer primer need to be sprayed. These finishes dry so fast there isn't a issue spraying them inside of a house however they are flammable and attention needs to be given to turn off anything in the house that might have a open flame. Also don't use box fans to vacate the fumes. A electric motor can create a spark that would ignite the paint. You can use box fans blowing fresh air into the house. The only issue I usually have finishing inside of a house is a light layer of dust from the dry finish settling on everything.
 

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That looks really nice, definitely a lot of sanding and taping with this type of work. I was hoping to use water based to keep odor to a minimum, any issues on adhesion?

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I used wb lacquer as stated. Cleaning well is key to adhesion. I also sprayed a high stick primer (UMA by XIM). So far has worked out well
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If you are wanting to go with water based there is issues with adhesion going over an existing finish. You might scuff sand the existing finish and coat the existing finish with Zinsser Sealcoat and then a white primer. If the cabinets have a lacquer finish you could also scuff sand the finish and coat them with a white lacquer primer. Both the sealcoat and the lacquer primer need to be sprayed. These finishes dry so fast there isn't a issue spraying them inside of a house however they are flammable and attention needs to be given to turn off anything in the house that might have a open flame. Also don't use box fans to vacate the fumes. A electric motor can create a spark that would ignite the paint. You can use box fans blowing fresh air into the house. The only issue I usually have finishing inside of a house is a light layer of dust from the dry finish settling on everything.
Glad you said about the fan causing sparks because I was gonna set one up. Definitely gonna mask and plastic everything though. And should shutoff the pilot to gas range top huh lol... I'll have to talk to my rep and get a good product line that matches my needs.

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Glad you said about the fan causing sparks because I was gonna set one up. Definitely gonna mask and plastic everything though. And should shutoff the pilot to gas range top huh lol... I'll have to talk to my rep and get a good product line that matches my needs.

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Any electric motor can make a spark. This includes your refrigerator. I also turn all the lights that are needed and leave them on. An electric switch can also cause a spark.

Really it takes a pretty good concentration of paint fumes to cause a flash fire but it doesn't hurt to be careful either. You hear horror stories all the time about someone cleaning something in a house with solvents and having it blow up on them.
 
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