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Pain in the A$$
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I'm wanting to try and build a basic cabinet. I also want it to have 2 or 3 drawers instead of doors. Could someone provide some "idiot proof" instructions or a link to some? I did a search but not much luck.

Thanks
 

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There are too many unknowns. Do you want a commercial look that has slab doors that cover the front of the cabinet or a more residential look with a faceframe. A rough sketch of what you want it to look like would help as well as the kind of wood you would like to use.
 

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Pain in the A$$
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Discussion Starter #3
Steve Neul said:
There are too many unknowns. Do you want a commercial look that has slab doors that cover the front of the cabinet or a more residential look with a faceframe. A rough sketch of what you want it to look like would help as well as the kind of wood you would like to use.
I am wanting a basic kitchen cabinet like what I would get at Lowes. My thoughts were to build it from Birch 3/4 plywood and then use dimensional lumber to frame the front.
 

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Lets see you have a picture, a plan on wood to use, I'm guessing you have measurements for the size and tools. So what's the problem? You have everything you need. :thumbsup:

You can ask more specific questions if needed but unless your asking for plans? We mostly draw our own plans so just getting a set is not likely. I say start working. You got this! However we're here to help just be more specific. :thumbsup:
 

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I am wanting a basic kitchen cabinet like what I would get at Lowes. My thoughts were to build it from Birch 3/4 plywood and then use dimensional lumber to frame the front.
With that type of cabinet if you are not trying to match existing cabinets I would build the cabinet 35 1/4" tall and 24" deep including a 1/4" back. The toespace would be 3 1/2" wide and set back 2 1/4" from the front of the box. With that type of cabinet you need to be real sure the bottom of the cabinet is perfectly square because it will determine how the drawers close. With faceframe construction there is some wiggle room for adjustment but on this one the drawer runners are mounted right on the side of the box. All of the parts shown in the drawing can be made out of birch plywood. The edges that face toward the front can be taped with veneer tape that is applied with an iron like you iron clothes with. The veneer has hot melt glue on it and the heat from the iron will melt the glue. Just cover the edge of the parts and trim the excess and sand them prior to assembling the cabinet. You will need to decide how big you want the drawers. With a cabinet like that I normally make the fronts 3/4" wider than the opening and 1/2" taller than the opening. The drawer box if you are using full extension drawer guides I would make them 1/2" smaller than the opening in height and 1 1/32" smaller in width and 22" deep. I normally use 1/2" Russian birch plywood to make the boxes.
 

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Despite Steve's good advice he kind of took the face frame off the table. Burbank mentioned using dimensional lumber to frame the front. It sounds like he wanted face frames. IDK it could be me.:laughing:

Same advice applies but those cabinets can have face frames. Allow for the difference on the sides. No need to use banding with face frames.

Two reasons I answered your question like I did. It allows you to be more specific and have to think this through. Plus you get more out of the build if you think it through more yourself.

Allows for your choice in design.
 

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Steve you cabinet and toe kick height allow for flooring to go around the cabinet. Is that correct.?

Just so he knows that there is an extra 1/2 allowed in there for that.
 

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Pain in the A$$
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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the comments.


I planned on face frames primarily cause all the kitchen cabinets with drawers use them so I thought it'd be required. I'm not set on this. This cabinet will be used for my wife's sewing area and the drawers will likely hold a lot if weight, so structural strength is very important.

As for height, the height of the cabinet will be 27-27.5" as I already have a heavy duty 1" office counter that will be going on it. That will allow for a working height for me wife of 28-28.5", which is perfect for her height while working in a chair.

This cabinet will also sit on carpet for now, but eventually floor tile or hardwood flooring.

At this point, some of my big concerns are:
- what's the best order to cut parts
- how do I join pieces? Dados?
- if I use face frames, how do I secure drawer slides to sides when there's a gap?

Thanks again!!!
 

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Thanks for all the comments.

This cabinet will also sit on carpet for now, but eventually floor tile or hardwood flooring.

At this point, some of my big concerns are:
- what's the best order to cut parts
- how do I join pieces? Dados?
- if I use face frames, how do I secure drawer slides to sides when there's a gap?

Thanks again!!!
Cut your sides first, then cut your and assemble the face frame. Butt joints work with glue only. i use small biscuits. Remember the toe kick area. 3" tall by 3" deep allows for a 1/2" thick piece to cover that toe kick area. Allow for that when making the face frame.

Also if using a face frame dado the sides for the bottom which should sit flush with top of bottom rail of face frame. Actually not if your using drawers but I do it anyway.

Rabbet the back for the back panel 1/4" is fine but some like 1/2" if using 1/4" a nailer strip is required to mount o the walls.

Cut 4 small tingles to put in the top corners to help get and keep everything square.

I usually attach e bottom and ides to the face frame clamp and let dry. Then I attach the back glue and pop a few brads. Stand
It up attach the corner triangles with glue and brads from inside the cabinet then let it dry good.

Build your drawer boxes according to the slides used. If the slides attach only to the sides make a filler strip the thickness needed to be flush with the inside of face frame glue them on pop a few brads and father it dries fully screw the slides on.

With all that said I use other then butt joints because I prefer it but many use butt joints and or pocket screws. I don't like them either.
 

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Steve you cabinet and toe kick height allow for flooring to go around the cabinet. Is that correct.?

Just so he knows that there is an extra 1/2 allowed in there for that.
I don't allow for flooring anymore. The cabinet height matches well with appliances for kitchens and when it is installed If I find out they are going to add flooring after the cabinets I just put an appropriate size furring strip under the cabinet to allow for the flooring. The few times I allowed for the thickness of flooring on the day of the install the flooring people beat me there and I ended up having to saw the bottom of the cabinet off. This way it will work either way.

As far as the faceframe it will just cut down on the drawer space. The picture in post 3 has the drawer fronts pretty much covering the front of the cabinet so I ommited the faceframe in the drawing. Normally when I build a cabinet with a faceframe I make the faceframe first and then build the box to fit on it. Depending on whether you use 1 1/2" to 2" wide material to make the frame I would leave the rail off at the bottom. It's just wasted space. I just put a piece of wood 3/4"x3/4" to cover the edge of the bottom.

As far as mounting the drawer guides on faceframe construction I make a drawer member out of 1/2" plywood with a 3/4"x3/4" block at the back and a 1/2"x1/2" block out of pine or other soft wood. The drawer member is nailed on the back side of the faceframe and the back is left loose until you put the drawer in. You slide the drawer in with the front already on the drawer until if fits well against the faceframe and then shoot a nail through the back to hold it and check it and if it works well put more nails in it. With this system I normally put a piece of plywood about 3" wide as a hanger running verticle against each side to nail the runner to. The cabinet member pictured a left one, they are made in pairs.
 

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Pain in the A$$
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Discussion Starter #11
RRBROWN, thanks again. If I get a chance to get in the garage I will start the layout. A few other things to finish first as this project is on my wish list mainly to see if I can. If I'm successful I'd like to do some for my garage as well.
 

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Some details may determine the fabrication of a cabinet like the one pictured.

Whether the cabinet will be painted, or whether it will be a natural wood or stained wood finish.

A frameless cabinet takes less solid wood (no face frame).

Being frameless allows for easier drawer installation for side mount slides.

Frameless hinges are more durable when mounted on the side of the cabinet instead of on the face frame.

The toe kick can be made as a loose toe kick.

The toe kick height and recess area if made to match appliances and other cabinetry, can vary.

The "usual" toe kick height is 4", and the recess is 3".






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