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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. I am looking for advice on a new (to me) table saw that will be my first stationary saw in my shop (garage). I am looking to buy used from CL and have been looking at a few models such as the ridgid R4512 (shying away due to the alignment issues with the weak trunnions). I am looking to get the best bang for my buck of course and would like a biesemeyer style fence on a cast iron top with a decent rip capacity. Anything else I should be looking for?

The saw I am highly considering from CL right now is a Delta 36-978/979 that the owner is asking $420 for. Is this a good deal? I can't find too much information the saw in forums. It looks to have a lare cast iron top with ~30 in rip capacity and a biesemeyer fence and it is well taken care of in the picture. I believe the saw sold retail for around $450 in 2008 so I would feel more comfortable around the $250 - $300 range if I can talk him down. Is this a good deal? Please let me know if you have any advice.

Thanks in advance!

Keaton
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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Welcome to the forum, Keaton! I don't have any first-hand knowledge of these saws but someone will be along shortly to assist. When you get a minute go ahead and complete your profile with location - this helps in questions like this for pricing items.

David
 

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My rule of thumb on used Equipment is that if it’s in nearly new condition, is that it should cost just a bit over half the cost when it was new. My logic is that if you’re not saving almost half, you might as well buy new, get the latest model and get the warranty. But that’s just me.

As for that saw, I think you might grow tired of the 1-1/2hp motor over a short period of time. Even the bump to 2 hp can make a big difference when cutting hard woods or thick stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both. I updated my location in my profile (Atlanta).

I also was looking at a 3hp Jet saw online (owner has not gotten back to me about the model, but looks to be their contractor) that the owner is asking $1000 for but I was obviously trying to get that down in price as I think in new condition it runs around $1200 and I didn't necessarily want to be in the $1000 range as I would like to get a planer and jointer too. I didn't know if this would be overkill for my needs or if something similar to the Delta would be better.

A little about what I plan to do. I have lined up a few furniture projects for friends and family (nightstands, dressers, built in seating) and would like to really get into the furniture side of things so I could definitely see myself eventually cutting through some hardwoods (maybe the 3hp is needed or maybe the 1-1/2 will suffice?).

Thanks for all the advice and any response!

Keaton
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I might be interested JMerriman. I believe I messaged you but I'm not too familiar with the forum design.

I don't know much about the unifence. I'm assuming the fence system on the Delta in my OP is a Delta T2 and not a true Beis. Any insight from others on the performance of the two different fence systems?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yeah thats the one I've been talking about. What are you thoughts? To me it looks clean and pretty well taken care of. The fence might not be as reliable as the unifence, no?

Let me know your thoughts.

Thanks
Keaton
 

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I have a Delta with a similar - who knows if it's 'identical' fence.
so I read thru the referenced thread.

some people should not be permitted buy power tools.
the thread and some of the contributors are way out in left-right-center-under-and-outer field with the ideas and conclusions.

on the feed end of the fence, left and right, are two largish diameter nylon screws.
they ride on the square tube.
their purpose is to adjust the fence "side(s)" to vertical.
people with big screwdrivers _and_ some common sense will also note the more you screw them in, the greater the gap table-to-fence. stop screwing around and back off on the adjustment screws.....

my Delta, it came with a gauge to set the height of the front square tube and the rear angle iron on which the fence tip-nylon guide rests. set correctly, not a problem. people who should not buy power tools and do not read the instruction manual usually have all kinds of issues, such as this among them.

it's a good fence. I did tweak mine - replacing the stupid plastic rectangular pads at the feed end with nylon license plate bolts. the pads would fall out, squish too much, etc. that bit is poor execution on Delta's part.

it's set up with less than 0.001" out of parallel with the right miter slot. and it holds that tolerance over time and position. not a whole lot more one can ask of a fence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok so the models that have been mentioned in the thread (36-979 & 34-441) what are the opinions on these saws? Have you heard good and bad about either? I think I can work with the fence on both. I'm just wanting a good contractor saw i can trust to get me through my year or two in woodworking before I decide to make a much larger investment. Other recommendations of models?

Thanks again guys,
Keaton
 

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Fence differences ...

I don't know much about the unifence. I'm assuming the fence system on the Delta in my OP is a Delta T2 and not a true Beis. Any insight from others on the performance of the two different fence systems?
A true Unifence from Delta with the single extruded front rail and a reversible fence extrusion is a "find" as they are no longer made and parts are hard to come by. I have 3 of them on my Sawzilla shown in My Photos. I really like that fence, but it's a bit finicky when you lock it down you have to keep some forward pressure on it. That's NOT a deal breaker. The reversible, high or low feature is awesome and the fence scale is accurate when adjusted properly.

The Beisemeyer is the workhorse of fences. It is Industrial Strength in every way. It locks down accurately each time and stays put. It can also be used with a fence scale in lieu of measuring to the blade. I'm talking the real deal Biesemeyer, not he clones. I don't know about them, but they may be equally reliable, I donno?

One of my Biesemeyers came with a Craftsman 10" hybrid table saw I got on sale.... I didn't need another table saw, but could not refuse as the price was less than half on the store display model. I really like that saw, discontinued now for over 10 years. However, Grizzly and others make hybrids which are smaller and lighter than full size 3 Hp cabinets saws, but perform almost as well. Some have the 2 Hp motors which would be the limit on a 120 Volt dedicated 20 AMP circuit. If you can find one, jump on it. I wouldn't sell mine 'cause I like it so much, so they may not come up often.

:smile2:
 

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I believe the Ridgid saws are actually the same as the old craftsman made by Emerson Home Depot bought Emerson and changed the name to Ridgid. If you can get one that will run 220v. I had a radial arm saw that would stall cutting anything over a 2x4. I converted it to 220v and then I could cut 2x12's all day and it wouldn't even slow down it was actually scary. a electrical eng friend told me that it doubles the torque as it is hitting from two phase angles when I got my table saw I got the 2hp motor that I converted to 220v. As far as fences I bought a Bought a INCRA TS and love it for both the saw and enclosed router table. I built a work station with 24" Stockroom Sander on left Table Saw center and enclosed Router cabinet Right with the Incra fence covers it all.
 

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