Woodworking Talk banner

21 - 27 of 27 Posts

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,027 Posts
You and I must be writing about two entirely different disc and belt sanders. I just noticed that you referred to a random orbit sander (ROS)as a disc sander. Two entirely different products.
The OP used the word "disc" in post #8, which wasn't made clear exactly what type of sander he was referring to. The reference I made was to his use of "disc", which I made clear by putting ROS in parenthesis, as you can see in my quote below.

cabinetman said:
I would start with a belt sander, as IMO it's more aggressive. It's more difficult to control than a disc type (ROS).
Thanks for bringing up the differences. I don't usually recommend air sanders, as many members don't have compressors that can support them.





.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,538 Posts
This is why not.

The block as it sits is valued in the $200.00 - $300.00 range. After the gouges and grooves from the result of the belt sander, not to mention the splotched look an attempt to fill cracks is going to cause, I'd estimate the monetary value to drop to $50.00 if one is very lucky.
You must really have a problem using a belt sander. What kind of sander do you have? I have never, ever had problems like that or seen anyone else have those type of problems.

With those kind of problems I also would not use a belt sander.

George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
All good information here... I will keep you posted on my progress... Even though it is heavy, I will get some help to lay it down and do the bottom of the block first. That way if I make a major mistake, the only ones who will ever see the mistakes are my dogs, a guest or family member laying on their back on the kitchen floor, (not often occurs) or very small children. That should help me get the feel of the wood and the use of an orbital sander..

Good estimate SanburRanch.. that is exactly what I paid for it...Again, helpful suggestions and the comments are appreciated...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,160 Posts
I would be very leery about actually using the butcher block for food preparation. In all likelihood, it is deeply soaked in meat liquids and various and sundry cleaning products. In my opinion, it just wouldn't be safe. It is virtually impossible to fully and properly sanitize something like this. Every one of those cracks and glue-line failures is perfect path for deep seated germs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Bob, do not use wood fillers for open cracks, they don't work, trust me. What I recommend is when sanding, save the sawdust, mix sawdust with Titebond III adhesive (found at HD or Lowe's), fill cracks, let dry for 24hrs, sand smooth. I generally start with a 40 grit on a random orbital sander, followed by 100 grit, then 180 grit, and finish with 220 to achieve a good smooth surface. Then apply several coats of food grade mineral oil. Your butcher block should then be a piece you can use for many years to come to prepare meat, etc.
 
21 - 27 of 27 Posts
Top