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Jack of too many trades..
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all. I'm in the midst of a shop redesign and am building a new central workbench island.

My last bench was pretty lightweight (2x4 top w/ hardboard on 2x4 legs). It was okay, but I want to make the new bench much more substantial, 4x4 Fir legs and a 2.5" to 3.5" thick top made of laminated Fir stud stock.

My main issue is that I have a sloping floor in the basement. Over 6' the floor drops around 1/2". Actually the whole basement slopes to the central floor drain, so the slope is always on two axis. Getting my vintage Unisaw positioned and leveled was a lot of "fun"...


I built the old workbench to match the slope in the floor (legs were different lengths). Since I am investing in heavy stock for the new bench, I'm not inclined to build the new bench with uneven legs, but I'm unsure that shimming the feet is going to be stable.

My current idea is to build feet not unlike Norm Abram's bench from the New Yankee Workshop (ep. 102 on YouTube http://youtu.be/IJjrB4SvMWg) The feet would be separate blocks, thicker on the low-side.

Does this sound like a good approach? Is there a simpler solution that I'm overlooking. I can't be the only guy with an sloping basement floor, but just about every workbench I've seen on this forum has plain square legs. How have basement shop folks sorted out this issue?

Thanks for any comments.
 

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where's my table saw?
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28,698 Posts
Just use the proper shims

I would not bother with adjustable legs and all, just not necessary. The shim should be a match for the slope, slightly fatter than the difference of 1/2" and then you can tap it underneath, a dab of glue will hold it in place. make it short enough so it doesn't stick out in the way of feet and other stuff. JMO.:yes:
 
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Keep it simple. A workbench needs to be flat and stable - the rest is preferences. I've seen whole threads about the advantages of square dog holes vs. round ones and I went with t-tracks. So woodnthings is right - a couple of blocks on the bottom and you're good to go.
 

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bzguy
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581 Posts
simple fix....pre-drill and install large lag bolts for feet, you can then take a level and adjust, get it perfectly flat and level on any surface.
 

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Old School
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simple fix....pre-drill and install large lag bolts for feet, you can then take a level and adjust, get it perfectly flat and level on any surface.
+1. :yes: I would install adjustable feet. Could be as simple as drilling out the legs and installing a "T" nut and a threaded foot, like this.




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I take it this table is floating? If its against the wall I would build it right off of the wall and make it not movable. Level it as needed and say its there until disassembly.
If it's floatable I think I would go with bz and his lag bolt adjuster idea.

Sorry-just saw island.
 

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I built mine with adjustable feet. Similar to what C Man suggested. I drilled the leg and screwed some T nuts on the bottom of the leg. Then I welded a large washer to a bolt and screwed the bolt into the T nut.
In addition to adjust for level it also allows to adjust for the perfect height.
 
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