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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Curious as to why you chose solid stock over stave coring your stiles and rails?
Because I’m just an old guy who took up woodworking after retirement doing the best I can. I had no idea what you were talking about so I had to look it up. I can certainly see where stave coring would make for a more stable door, but also requires a lot more machining, glueing, resawing and veneering, but I’m not really set up for all that. These are the only doors I ever expect to make. The house I’m replacing is 100 years old and has solid wood doors which have held up well, although they do have a mortise and tenon joints.

I hope racking doesn’t become a problem. Time will tell. The openings are standard size so the doors can be replaced if they fail. With the six panel doors, about 25 of the 80 inch height is glued 1/2 inch deep cope and stick joints so I’m hoping the doors hold up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I don’t find hickory any more unstable then anything else. All the wood species can all surprise you sometimes when cutting or milling.

What I find make wood unstable is knots and other defects so I avoid the rustic hickory and pay extra to get clear lumber.
 

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With the six panel doors, about 25 of the 80 inch height is glued 1/2 inch deep cope and stick joints so I’m hoping the doors hold up.
25+ years ago, my dad and I decided to make doors when we finished my basement. We probably did everything wrong. Perhaps the worse part was that the stiles and rails (just 2 each, top/bottom and left/right) were butt jointed with a double row of biscuits. The center panel is 1/2" oak plywood. There are 3 doors. They have all held up perfectly with no sign of movement at all.

What I find make wood unstable is knots and other defects so I avoid the rustic hickory and pay extra to get clear lumber.
I'll keep this in mind when I work with hickory, especially for the kitchen cabinets. My wife likes the rustic look. She doesn't want raised panels, so the cabinet doors will have plywood panels. She's going for a simple look, at least for the kitchen cabinets. I'll experiment with clear stiles and rails and rustic panels and see how that looks.
 

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Because I’m just an old guy who took up woodworking after retirement doing the best I can. I had no idea what you were talking about so I had to look it up. I can certainly see where stave coring would make for a more stable door, but also requires a lot more machining, glueing, resawing and veneering, but I’m not really set up for all that. These are the only doors I ever expect to make. The house I’m replacing is 100 years old and has solid wood doors which have held up well, although they do have a mortise and tenon joints.

I hope racking doesn’t become a problem. Time will tell. The openings are standard size so the doors can be replaced if they fail. With the six panel doors, about 25 of the 80 inch height is glued 1/2 inch deep cope and stick joints so I’m hoping the doors hold up.
Wasn't trying to be critical, the doors a beautiful sir. This is why I am here. After over 50 years of woodworking I think I am starting to scratch the surface of knowledge.
 

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25+ years ago, my dad and I decided to make doors when we finished my basement. We probably did everything wrong. Perhaps the worse part was that the stiles and rails (just 2 each, top/bottom and left/right) were butt jointed with a double row of biscuits. The center panel is 1/2" oak plywood. There are 3 doors. They have all held up perfectly with no sign of movement at all.


I'll keep this in mind when I work with hickory, especially for the kitchen cabinets. My wife likes the rustic look. She doesn't want raised panels, so the cabinet doors will have plywood panels. She's going for a simple look, at least for the kitchen cabinets. I'll experiment with clear stiles and rails and rustic panels and see how that looks.
25+ years ago, my dad and I decided to make doors when we finished my basement. We probably did everything wrong. Perhaps the worse part was that the stiles and rails (just 2 each, top/bottom and left/right) were butt jointed with a double row of biscuits. The center panel is 1/2" oak plywood. There are 3 doors. They have all held up perfectly with no sign of movement at all.


I'll keep this in mind when I work with hickory, especially for the kitchen cabinets. My wife likes the rustic look. She doesn't want raised panels, so the cabinet doors will have plywood panels. She's going for a simple look, at least for the kitchen cabinets. I'll experiment with clear stiles and rails and rustic panels and see how that looks.
How the lumber is stored, handled, processed and machined can all effect stability. Moisture content is another factor as well as simply how the lumber is cut. flat sawn lumberwill not be as stable as quarter sawn lumber.
 

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How the lumber is stored, handled, processed and machined can all effect stability. Moisture content is another factor as well as simply how the lumber is cut. flat sawn lumberwill not be as stable as quarter sawn lumber.
I know all that now, but didn't back then. You'll laugh at how we made the stiles ad rails. We had a lot of 3/4" red oak. It all had at least some bow to it. We figured out when you glue two of them together, you can move or bend them against each other to take out the bow. Once we got them "straight" (no bow) we shot a couple of 18 Gauge finish nails into them with an air nailer so they wouldn't slide around and clamped them together. We tried it with two boards and they stayed dead straight when the clamps came off, so that's how we did all of the stiles and rails. We had a jointer, but no way to thickness wood, so we left the doors at whatever they were with the glue up (a little over 1-1/2" because the wood was more than 3/4"). We were making the jambs, so the thickness didn't have to be a standard 1-3/8".
 

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Nice work! I made a custom screen door out of a single piece of 6/4 x 11in x 12ft Poplar. At the time, the only power tools I had were a drill press, band saw, circular saw, router, miter saw, and oscillating edge sander, and I had 4
Bessey K clamps - two 24" and two 48".

I rough cut the length with the circular saw, then ripped the frame rails with an 8ft level as a straight edge & the circular saw. The rest I cut on the bandsaw. Sanded everything on the edge sander, & did a 1/2" round-over on both sides. I even cut out a handle for the inside of the door from the Poplar. I used the concrete shop floor to layout & assemble using Kreg pocket hole jig that I purchased just for making the door.

Amazingly, door is still nice & straight, & still in use!


Just need a better way to put the screen in, the spline keeps falling out no matter what size I use :(
 
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