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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
Thought some might be interested in what it takes to build your own doors. I’m having a house built, but I’m doing all my own cabinets, doors, casings and other trim work.

This is the 6th of my 10 doors. I started with three pine doors, next were two cherry doors, and this is the only hickory door I’m building.





My wood supplier only had two pieces of 8/4 hickory available. They were 12 feet long, one, a little wider then 10 inches, the other a little less then 12 inches. I don’t know if you’ve worked with hickory, but it is heavy. Each piece must have been over 100 pounds and I had to drag them to my miter saw where I was able to cut them in two. The largest pieces about 87 inches.



I spent the morning planing and jointing.


Then took my cut list


Cut up the boards, working around defects. This is the final pile of pieces, waiting for profiling.



This is left over scrap.



Now I’m off for a nap, can only spend so many hours a day on my feet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Tonight involved profiling the edges and ends on shapers. I was initially concerned about tear out on the hickory as I’ve had to modify methods when using router tables, but the hickory did fine with only minor tear out on the tongue.





Then off to the workbench for some chisel time getting rid of the fuzzies caused by two cutters intersecting.




Once all the material was prepared it’s off to the clamping table to check fit.



And square up the center rails.



Mark the center of door and middle of intermediate style to get it perfectly aligned. No time to do this once you glue it up.



Once everything is squared up and centered I make heavy marks to make alignment easy once they go back together.



Still needed to fit top center style. Can only do this after everything put together and checked for fit.



Measured the size of the raised panels. Tomorrow I go through the pile of hickory to find the perfect boards.

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I’ll just be glueing them up with tight bond extend. The cope and stick with 1/2 deep tongue and groove seems to work. It only has to last long enough for me to die, then it’s someone else’s problem.


Found a perfect board. Wide enough to get my panel, long enough to get all six panels. It has more white then brown which will go good with the almost all brown style and rails.

Spent the morning cutting the board down, raising the panels, checking the grain pattern and marking the edges to make sure I don’t have to figure it out later.



Next off to sanding and putting a coat on each side of the panels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sanded and put finish on raised panels.


While waiting for finish to dry I gathered everything needed to glue up the door. Once you start you can’t run around gathering things. Glue needs to be applied to 14 joints before final adjustments and clamping. Even with extend glue there is barely time to get everything in place.



I find it easier to build door on edge and lay down for final clamping. I use a couple boards clamped to the clamping table to hold the style upright. This is what it looks like when assembly begins.



This is what it looks like glued together and clamped to the table. Tomorrow the sanding and finishing get done.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You really need a coping jig...
I have coping sleds but find them more trouble then what they are worth. Constantly adjusting for the various width boards, and backer board needs to be changed based on whether there is profile on the edge of the board or not.

I’d rather adjust the shaper fence parallel to miter slot and just use miter gauge.
 

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Nice work, younhave the right machines.

I guess “eclectic” would be the right term for the panel grain? 😁

It will darken up appreciably. The first kitchen I built was hickory - never again!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Second side complete. Three days from start to finish. Thanks for the comments and following along.



Dr Robert, I’m still working on the kitchen cabinets. The boxes are built and installed. Decided to do face frames after installation because I have lots of odd angles to deal with in my house.

My wife says she has always wanted hickory kitchen cabinets so who am I to argue.
 

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Very nice.

While waiting for finish to dry I gathered everything needed to glue up the door. Once you start you can’t run around gathering things. Glue needs to be applied to 14 joints before final adjustments and clamping. Even with extend glue there is barely time to get everything in place.
Did you consider gluing them up in stages? I find doing things in stages is necessary sometimes, especially if I don't have a helper. I haven't tried it on a glue up though. I would think it would mean clamping up the whole thing with glue in just some of the joints. After that sets, take off the clamps and unglued parts and repeat until done. I know that would add time, but it beats messing things up. I had a long face frame where a couple of joints started to set before I got it all clamped. Luckily I had a couple of 3/4" pipe clamps nearby that were long enough and strong enough to pull the joints tight. As a result, I've always thought about gluing up in stages, just haven't done a project since that required it.

My wife says she has always wanted hickory kitchen cabinets so who am I to argue.
Going to be doing a full remodel on a house we plan to move to. Will most likely make almost everything that is wood in the house - doors, cabinets, trim, etc. My wife picked hickory for the kitchen cabinets, which surprised me. She usually thinks wood is wood. She likes your door. There are 2 other rooms on the same level, a dinette (converting it from formal dinning room) and living room (won't be formal with the redo). Going to open up the whole level to more or less one big room. I'm thinking of going with hickory for everything, with the exception of the flooring.

@Terry Q, appreciate your thread here, especially since some of our doors will be hickory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Very nice.


Did you consider gluing them up in stages? I find doing things in stages is necessary sometimes, especially if I don't have a helper. I haven't tried it on a glue up tough. I would think it would mean clamping up the whole thing with glue in just some of the joints. After that sets, take off the clamps and unglued parts and repeat until done. I know that would add time, but it beats messing things up. I had a long face frame where a couple of joints started to set before I got it all clamped. Luckily I had a couple of 3/4" pipe clamps nearby that were long enough and strong enough to pull the joints tight. As a result, I've always thought about gluing up in stages, just haven't done a project since that required it.



Going to be doing a full remodel on a house we plan to move to. Will most likely make almost everything that is wood in the house - doors, cabinets, trim, etc. My wife picked hickory for the kitchen cabinets, which surprised me. She usually thinks wood is wood. She likes your door. There are 2 other rooms on the same level, a dinette (converting it from formal dinning room) and living room (won't be formal with the redo). Going to open up the whole level to more or less one big room. I'm thinking of going with hickory for everything, with the exception of the flooring.

@Terry Q, appreciate your thread here, especially since some of our doors will be hickory.
I hadn’t considered doing it in smaller glue ups. It might work. I’ll consider it on future doors.

I’m doing all the woodwork and cabinets in my house too, but different rooms get different wood species. Pine, hickory, cherry, walnut and birdseye maple. The only way to do that is to do it yourself. I plan on having projects to work on for the rest of my life eventually making furniture to match the rooms.

When I first started buying hickory I would avoid the light colored pieces, especially when making casing and baseboard. After I made a vanity and laundry tub cabinet I realized how important the contracting colors are to make the project stick out. Im planning on using mostly darker colored wood for face frames and door/drawer frames, with lots of light wood in raised panels.

 

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I’m doing all the woodwork and cabinets in my house too, but different rooms get different wood species. Pine, hickory, cherry, walnut and birdseye maple. The only way to do that is to do it yourself. I plan on having projects to work on for the rest of my life eventually making furniture to match the rooms.
Pretty much what my wife and I are doing with the house we will be moving to. We started with a fence so we can bring our dogs with us while we work on the house. It will be finished in another week. I wish I had set up the shop there before doing the fence. It just would have made things easier. So, the shop is the next project.

I'd be interested in hearing about what woods you are using in each room and why you picked it.

When I first started buying hickory I would avoid the light colored pieces, especially when making casing and baseboard. After I made a vanity and laundry tub cabinet I realized how important the contracting colors are to make the project stick out. Im planning on using mostly darker colored wood for face frames and door/drawer frames, with lots of light wood in raised panels.
That sounds like a good plan. When my wife picked hickory for the kitchen and I started planning in my head, I struggled a bit with the color variation. I'm too used to trying to make things match I guess. Over time, I came to the same conclusion as you, the color variation makes the project. My wife also likes rustic hickory. I had to adjust my mind to that too. I'm used to avoiding knots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I wish I had set up the shop there before doing the fence. It just would have made things easier. So, the shop is the next project.

I'd be interested in hearing about what woods you are using in each room and why you picked it.


That sounds like a good plan. When my wife picked hickory for the kitchen and I started planning in my head, I struggled a bit with the color variation. I'm too used to trying to make things match I guess. Over time, I came to the same conclusion as you, the color variation makes the project. My wife also likes rustic hickory. I had to adjust my mind to that too. I'm used to avoiding knots.
My workshop was completed before the house. We moved into the workshop and lived in there last winter when working on house. Not as bad as it sounds, the workshop has half bath and central heat/air conditioning. Slept in the loft.

The woods I picked are all locally available and easy to come by.

The pine is used in guest bedroom/bathroom. It pay homage to the original cabin that my father-in-law built in the early 50’s. If in-laws visit they can reminisce looking at the few items we recycled from the old cabin.

My wife wanted hickory kitchen cabinets, and since the living room, kitchen and a half bath are all grouped together on the first floor they all get hickory.

The two master bedrooms on either end of second story are for me and my wife. I like cold rooms and dark colors so I’m on the north end of the house with walnut bedroom. The wife’s bedroom is on south side of the house in a nice bright warm room. She gets the birdseye maple because I saw a house refurbishing show on tv where the wife’s bedroom was birdseye maple and it was really impressive. I thought to myself, if I ever get to build a house that is what I want to do. Now I’m doing it.

Cherry is getting used on second floor bathroom and guest bedroom. Used because I like working with cherry and why not.

My wood supplier asked if I wanted the rustic hickory, but I consider wood with knots to be less stable and have a hard time purposely seeking it out.
 

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First side sanded and 3 coats of finish applied, tomorrow the other side gets finished.

Pretty door. Nice attention to grain orientation. I hope it holds up without M&T for such a heavy door. Have you had any racking problems? I rarely do doors with solid lumber with the exception of straight grain mahogany and vertical grain fir. Perhaps quartersawn woods would work. Curious as to why you chose solid stock over stave coring your stiles and rails?
 

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Do you feel hickory has a lot of internal stress? I remember when I did out kitchen, I had a lot of issues getting straight stiles, or them staying straight. Could have just been the lumber.

Grain matching is a big issue, and you’ve done a great job there. Lumber selection can be difficult. I ended up using hickory plywood for the panels, one of the issues there was making sure the sheets had similar grain patterns, again, a lot of waste b/c of sapwood.

I used Whiteside bits all the way through and I was amazed how they held up. Think I went through 3 sets of saw blades. That was when I discovered Freud isn’t as good a blade as everyone thinks.

I was so burned out after that kitchen, mostly b/c it was the first big project I did ans put myself under too much pressure. Had to do over, I would have spent the money and had the doors built.

12 years later, I did a complete redo.

Cabinetry Building Wood Countertop Kitchen
Cabinetry Furniture Countertop Building Wood


Countertop Cabinetry Kitchen Kitchen stove Lighting
 

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Hickory can create a lot of stress working with it. We had a lot of trouble making butcher block tops with it. I started to make a tv stand with hickory and it ended up I the firepit. I do like it for my work bench..
 

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DAAANG!!! that is a good looking door. i had never dealt with hickory before moving into my 1875ish farm house with hickory flooring. almost white board next to an almost black board makes for some awesome contrast. funny thing is that it was under 4 layers of asbestos and vinyl roll flooring (kitchen) and carpet in the dining room. refinishing them was fun, not...

i certainly appreciate the wood grain matching in the panels (y) (y) (y)
 
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