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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just had to rip out a contractor FUBAR for capping stair treads. I am almost finished prepping the original steps for the new risers and treads I will be installing but need to make a change in the bottom tread. The existing tread is curved on the right side and I want to square it off. I am looking for advice on building a box for the new right corner. The new riser will traverse the width of the tread, 42 inches, and then go under what was the curved part. Sorry for the trash bag over the curved part of the step in the image.

428362
 

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So, are you going to rip out what's there and make a new tread and riser with a boxed in end? Where are you starting from? Not using any of this existing. I hope?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So, are you going to rip out what's there and make a new tread and riser with a boxed in end? Where are you starting from? Not using any of this existing. I hope?
Unfortunately the contractors that attempted to do the treads bolted, screwed, nailed, or whatever to secure the bottom tread and box and it is firmly in place now. Unless I want to demolish it and risk the rest of the stairs (which are not really in great shape either, I plan to approach it differently. I have to raise the bottom tread anyway because of the new flooring you see. I will be using retro-tread caps for all the steps. The image of the steps is what they look like now. The contractor cut the new treads too shallow, tried to make up the difference by using two riser panels but it still did not work, used a water based adhesive which the treads say "absolutely" not to use, glued the new risers over two coats of old paint, and glued the treads over dirty and stained original reads. A bit more sanding and scraping and the steps will be ready to accept the new panels.

What I am attempting to do is to place the new tread (see below) over the existing one using a straight riser. At the right end of the new riser I will install a short riser to the wall at a 90 degree angle to the other riser. My question is how do I join the two risers together properly?

428363


This is what the treads look like.

428364
 

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I would fit the new long riser and the short one together as an assembly, using a mitered corner and a vertical glue block before attaching it to the existing one. The new treads look great! The bottom one needs to be longer than the rest of course .... hope you planned for that? I'd like to see what the new risers look like and how they will fit either behind the new tread or butted on up under it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would fit the new long riser and the short one together as an assembly, using a mitered corner and a vertical glue block before attaching it to the existing one. The new treads look great! The bottom one needs to be longer than the rest of course .... hope you planned for that? I'd like to see what the new risers look like and how they will fit either behind the new tread or butted on up under it?
Thanks, that's just what I was looking for. I will post as the job continues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've run into quite the conundrum. The bull nose on the original tread is 1 3/8" long and the bull nose on the new treads is only 1" long. There is no way I can stay in code for the tread depth and keep the riser flush with the new tread. If you look at the image of the new tread you can see the bull nose drops down to overlap the riser. I have been struggling for three days trying to figure out why I can't get the measurements right. The only solution I can come up with is to shim the bottom (overlap) of the bull nose on the new tread with a 3/8" strip and finish it the same as the tread. The other alternative would be to rip the overlapping part of the bull nose off the new treads but then it won't match the upstairs treads. Is there anything else you might suggest?
 

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I would like to see the stack of the tread and the riser in two arrangements:
20210614_140743.jpg


Which way will give you the best length of tread to meet code? My guess is the tread butted to the riser will extend it further. I don't know any of the measurements, however....
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would like to see the stack of the tread and the riser in two arrangements: View attachment 428389

Which way will give you the best length of tread to meet code? My guess is the tread butted to the riser will extend it further. I don't know any of the measurements, however....
Thank you. The top image is what the current treads look like but the tread does not have contoured bull nose, it is simply a round nose. The distance from the front of the bull nose to the riser below is 1 3/8". The bottom image is what the new tread installation will be and correctly depicts the bull nose. The bull nose on the new tread is 1" from the edge of the bull nose to the vertical overlap edge on the underside of the contoured nose where it meets the riser.

The distance from the riser to the end of the bull nose on the existing tread is 10 3/8". Since the new tread is 3/8" shorted from the tip of the bull nose to flat that butts up against the riser I can't see a way other than what I described earlier to keep the tread within code.

I did the upstairs steps about 5 years ago and just discovered I measured to the end of the bull nose instead of the where the flat of the steps end. So I guess those steps are 3/8" short. Many terrific people here helped me on that project and you can see it here. Capping oak steps - need advice
 
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