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I purchased this tool many years ago, and I only used it a few times for some rough jobs back then. It is still pretty new, as I would say. I believe the actual model is "14 Inch Jack Plane No C5". It is 13.5 in long, has a cast body and a 2-inch blade (6.5 inches long), a.k.a. "PLS2" blade, mounted at 45 deg and sharpened to a 25 degree bevel.

The problems with it as I am seeing are as follows:

1) The blade is stamped and not quite flat. It also has rough edges. I spent some time grinding it by hand and then sharpening/honing it using 1000- and 6000-grit wet stones and a Veritas Mk II honing guide. I got more or less decent results, yet I suppose it is cheap Chinese steel and not particularly hard. Can/should the blade be replaced by something more decent?

2) The 25 degree bevel is too steep and reduces the rigidity of the cut, or so I read. I've seen a suggestion that mentions re-grinding the blade at a 35 degree bevel with and additional 5 degree micro bevel instead. Is that a valid point?

3) The sole of the plane is not flat. It somewhat concave lengthwise, with a 1 mm clearance in the middle. I am assuming it is a problem, but is it severe? Can it be remedied somehow? I don't have a belt sander or anything like that.

Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you!
plane.jpg
 

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I would leave the 25 degrees. That is standard for a bench plane and it's all I ever use.

I better blade and chip breaker would certainly make it perform better. I don't usually suggest replacement blades but that's for vintage plane, some of these cheap newer planes will see an improvement.

If you're using it as a smoother, then the sole needs to be coplanar. It should touch at the heal, behind the mouth and toe. In front of the mouth helps to. Anything else does not matter.

All this assumes you want to smooth with it. If you want to use it as an actual jack, just camber the blade and have at it.


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I purchased this tool many years ago, and I only used it a few times for some rough jobs back then. It is still pretty new, as I would say. I believe the actual model is "14 Inch Jack Plane No C5". It is 13.5 in long, has a cast body and a 2-inch blade (6.5 inches long), a.k.a. "PLS2" blade, mounted at 45 deg and sharpened to a 25 degree bevel.

The problems with it as I am seeing are as follows:

1) The blade is stamped and not quite flat. It also has rough edges. I spent some time grinding it by hand and then sharpening/honing it using 1000- and 6000-grit wet stones and a Veritas Mk II honing guide. I got more or less decent results, yet I suppose it is cheap Chinese steel and not particularly hard. Can/should the blade be replaced by something more decent?

2) The 25 degree bevel is too steep and reduces the rigidity of the cut, or so I read. I've seen a suggestion that mentions re-grinding the blade at a 35 degree bevel with and additional 5 degree micro bevel instead. Is that a valid point?

3) The sole of the plane is not flat. It somewhat concave lengthwise, with a 1 mm clearance in the middle. I am assuming it is a problem, but is it severe? Can it be remedied somehow? I don't have a belt sander or anything like that.

Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you!
View attachment 428137
if you are trying to get the sole of the plane and blade and chip breaker flat you need more aggressive wet sand paper like 120 to get flat than 250 to refine it some what don’t need to get it shiny it’s not furniture but to make furniture. The blade can be be used the same way to get flat then obviously you will need to go into the higher grits for get nice smooth surface. Don’t worry to much about the angles not to big of a deal.
 

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I recommend you get the blade sharp first then worry about the rest.

To sharpen the blade, just watch this

Getting the back flat will take longer than sharpening the bevel. Rob uses some expensive stones that he sells. Use what you have.
 

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where's my table saw?
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If that plane was mine, I'd remove the tote and round off all the sharp edges with a coarse file. Then sand it smooth. Any amount of using that as is will result in painful palms and possibly blisters.
Then you can deal with flattening the sole using wet dry sandpaper glued to a flat bench top or some plate glass starting with 80 grit and moving up. I do have a 6" X 48" belt sander so I'd use that. It also works real well for flatting the blade and putting a bevel on. Then go to the diamond stones for finishing.
 
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