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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So i dropped the chair on the floor and part of the support broke.
See attached.
Any ideas what kind of wood this could be and where could i get such a piece.
It seems like this should be easy to cut and slightly bend just by twisting it a little.

Or Not sure if gluing the broken part will bring the structure back to life?
Would i use gorilla glue for this?
 

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So i dropped the chair on the floor and part of the support broke.
See attached.
Any ideas what kind of wood this could be and where could i get such a piece.
It seems like this should be easy to cut and slightly bend just by twisting it a little.

Or Not sure if gluing the broken part will bring the structure back to life?
Would i use gorilla glue for this?
From the left photo the wood appears t be in the oak family. I do not know your skill level, but here are the options I see. Option 1: Remove the piece from the chair, it appears to be bolted on. The part appears to be around 3/4" thick. Cut a kerf in the bottom of the piece where the damage is 1/8" -1/4". Insert a piece of hardwood into the kerf, filling the kerf. The grain should run opposite of the existing grain and crack. Glue the spline in using glue of choice, I would suggest Titebond original or Epoxy. Shape the spline to the original piece, touch up finish, and re-install. Option 2: Remove the part, use it as a template and duplicate. I would go with option 1. Gorilla glue is useless when it comes to strength. Completely inferior to A/R, PVA, or Epoxies. It is also very messy, I would not use it or suggest it.
 

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where's my table saw?
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It's a "split", it's not broken! You can repair the split by wedging in some thin veneer and gluing with epoxy. Run the grain parallel with what's there. Rub some fine wire like a fishing leader into the split to clean it out then wedge in your veneer and epoxy into it. You may not need to remove the bolt, but if it comes out easily do it. That will make access to the split easier. You can wedge it open "slightly" but be cautious not to make it worse.
 

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The piece is more aesthetic than functional. If you can remove the piece from the chair you could do a better fix. You could set it against the fence on a table saw with the crack centered with the blade and rip it up to the bolt hole with the blade raised all the way up. Then cut a 1/8" sliver of oak and glue it into the part with wood glue. Then smooth it over and touch up the finish. If the part isn't removable put a bead of wood glue over the crack and rub it into the crack with your thumb. Do it several times so you know you got enough glue in it and then clamp it. What ever glue oozes out clean off with a wet rag. It really doesn't look like a fresh break so I think you will get a minimal strength from gluing it.

I wouldn't recommend using gorilla glue on furniture. Not only is it poor adhesive, it's really nasty once it starts expanding like expansion foam. Gorilla glue is better suited for poor fitted rough construction, not furniture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thank you all for comments. I will remove the screw to see how it looks like and if the split is going into where the screw is. Definitely after i dropped the chair and it split it made the back support little flimsy so this must be fixed.
 

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In most cases when it comes to chairs, each joint is depending on the others to help keep it alive and well. When I did chair repairs, I invariably ended up taking most of it apart so be expecting that probability
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So the split is a little longer but it stills kind of holds together.
Would not putting epoxy around and inside the split be enough to restore its strength? (Put glue and clamp)
What kind of glue would you recommend?

If i need to cut out the broken piece and glue then seems like more work.
 

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where's my table saw?
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So the split is a little longer but it stills kind of holds together.
Would not putting epoxy around and inside the split be enough to restore its strength? (Put glue and clamp)
What kind of glue would you recommend?

If i need to cut out the broken piece and glue then seems like more work.
Here's what we don't know. Did the split originate before it was dropped? Is there still a tension in the wood that tends to pull it apart?
Epoxy will only bond and add strength inside the split, not around the outside. The bolt hole stopped the split from continuing past.
Even if you make a kerf a fill it with a thin slice, the bond is now on two separate surfaces as opposed to only one, the split.
I say give it a try by putting the epoxy into the split and clamp it closed.
 

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Never tried the JB Wood Weld but I guess it will work. It says for wood.
I generally never use any epoxy other than West System. Been using it over 35 years.
 

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