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In History is the Future
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I decided to build a couple of side tables for my wife (she's been asking for them for 2 yrs:eek:) and it wasnt in the original 'mind design' but I figured I'd throw some Breadboard Ends on it and use it as a tutorial!

I'll be doing this build with primarily traditional hand tools but you can do the same with power tools if you like. I just enjoy a quiet project now n then.

These are very small tables with only 7/8" thick material. I typically would not do a bb on such a small and thin table, in fact I really don't care for them in general but that's neither here nor there. That said there are a few details that differ from what I would do on a large table however the principles remain the same.

I'm going to skip over all the associated build picts and just get to the nuts n bolts. Bare with me as I'm going to break this all down into a couple post and You'll know when I'm done :smile:

This picks up where table top is glued-up and jointed, breadboards jointed and ripped. I did use a TS for the rips but all jointing and planing with Stanley / Bailey 3,5,7.

First things first, the Breadboard dados. I'm using a Stanley #45 plane set up as a dado plane with a 1/2" cutter. My Dado is not centered as the top of the BB is subject to greater shearing force from downward pressure. (Just my own opinion)
 

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In History is the Future
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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Now that the dados are cut we know how thick our tongue needs to be. I failed to document it but I used a marking gauge to mark the tongue location on the table ends.

I'll be cutting the tongues with a Stanley 79 with the nicker blade in place (thanks Brink:thumbsup:). After setting the fence, the plane is drug backwards across the piece a few time to allow the nipper to score the grain. Then go at it! the 79 can make really quick work of cutting down a tongue. About 5 min per shoulder.

You (I) want the lower shoulder a tiny bit deeper than the top one to allow the bb to be drawn very tightly to the top with little or no seem.

The last picture shows the 'nicker'.
 

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In History is the Future
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Next the peg holes lay out. One in the center, one to either side. A larger table could have more but you want one centered. I typically would use a square peg for this but as before it's such a small table I was concerned with splitting the soft Cypress while mortising the thin tongue. I went with a "hardwood dowel" instead.

After layout, drill (mortise) your holes in only the end piece. next dry fit the two pieces. Generally I would mark through and cut a mortise closer to the shoulder in order to draw the pieces tightly together. Being I used dowels instead, I fitted the two pieces together then switched to a smaller bit and drilled through the existing hole but against the inside edge. Removed the part and switched back to the correct size bit and redrilled. That gave me slightly offset holes! The center hole in the tongue is simply a hole any holes other than the center must be slotted to allow for E&C. I simply rocked the bit to either side to create slots.
 

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In History is the Future
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Trim the tongues. Next the pieces all come together. The center 1" (small table) of the tongue and dado have glue applied and fitted. The dowel is tapered to one side, driven in with a bit of glue applied to the secure the dowel only to the top of the dado shoulder (otherwise the slotted hole is useless) and the dowels cut with a flush cut saw.

Trim the sides of the ends. Cut a small filler piece to glue into dado edge (leave E&C room this just keeps it from having a hole there if the top shrinks)

After its all dry use a block plane to trim up where needed and you are done! I will update with a couple more pictures once it's trimmed up. I left em with wet glue yesterday eve.

On larger table I would do a stopped dado on the end, this being such a small table I would have had to use a mortise chisel for the entire dado (no fun) hence the filler pieces on the ends of the dados.

Hope you learned something, if not I hope you at least enjoyed it. Feel free to ask any questions you care to. If you have a completely different methodology, feel free to start a separate tutorial thread and demonstrate yours!

Take Care!
 

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Log dog
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Hey Tom the table looks very nice I like the BB ends. I like the fact that your doing it without power tools. Different techniques. My only question is,are the BB ends going to be restricted due to the dowels? Wood movement.
 

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You did good there, you plow plane pushin', rabbet plane wranglin' hand saw slingin' fool. :)

Nice tutorial, excellent descriptions.

Why not recut that long shoulder, or, trim a little off the end?
 

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Log dog
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firemedic said:
No, the center is held in place and does not move. All other holes are SLOTTED allowing E&C...
Ok. Didn't see that on pics. Keep em coming.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Took me a bit to remember his name here on the forum, but a special thanks to robhodge1 who provided me with the Stanley 45 as a gift to say thanks for a tour of a bit of South Louisiana! It's being put to good use... I only did a light cleaning on it for now but will post pictures once I do a full restore.

~tom. ...oh to find my sanity...
 

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Took me a bit to remember his name here on the forum, but a special thanks to robhodge1 who provided me with the Stanley 45 as a gift to say thanks for a tour of a bit of South Louisiana! It's being put to good use... I only did a light cleaning on it for now but will post pictures once I do a full restore.

~tom. ...oh to find my sanity...
No problem Tom! Glad to see her finally at work. Still haven't gotten around to using my 45 yet. One of these days...
 

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Firemedic

Thanks for your great post, getting ready to build a large dining table
from doug fir beams and boards I salvaged from my uncles 200 year old barn.

Question, I inherited a Stanley #45 plane, still in the box from my great grandfather, and seeing that you did the work on your breadboard with
that plane, do you have any tips/tricks for setting up the plane? I have the dado attachment and molding cutters, etc, but no idea on how to use it. Any links you may have would be great also.

Thanks

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Firemedic Thanks for your great post, getting ready to build a large dining table from doug fir beams and boards I salvaged from my uncles 200 year old barn. Question, I inherited a Stanley #45 plane, still in the box from my great grandfather, and seeing that you did the work on your breadboard with that plane, do you have any tips/tricks for setting up the plane? I have the dado attachment and molding cutters, etc, but no idea on how to use it. Any links you may have would be great also. Thanks Rob
I do but unfortunately I no longer support this site. If you do a google search of my name, Jean Becnel, you will find my contact info and I would be happy to help you off site.
 
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