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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up this brass plane several years ago at an estate sale. I thought it was cool. It has been on a shelf for probably 15 years...I never did anything with it. No markings that I can see. Anybody know anything about this.
 

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Someone decided that it would be cool to plane nails. Should I use the jointer to clean up the base or is there a better way. I have had this plane since the early 80's and just sitting on the shelf.
Jointer as in the likes of a No. 7 hand plane seems appropriate.

I would not use my power jointer, mostly because I manage to somehow make a flat board curved end to end with my power jointer.

If I want flat, I use self stick 80 grit abrasive on a granite slab and hand sand. Takes a little longer, more perspiration, but I like the results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Do you think that brass shoulder plane could be an old shop-made infill? I know infills were popular across the pond back in the day, but I don't know much else about em
That's what I was thinking. I haven"t really seen one like it and given that I can't find any markings on the plane you might just be spot on.
 

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You may find that the plane is bronze and not brass,often Patten makers would make there own tools and this would account for the fact that there is no makers name on the tool.
These tools are often refaired to as Craftsman made this does not mean it is inferior in any way just it is more of a user as collectors prefair their tools to have names on them.

The one you picture is a true bull nose plane allowing the user to work hard up to any corner or against any piece butted up against the piece that is being worked.

The infill and wedge was usually made of hard wood such as Mahogany or rosewood but could be made of any wood
Just a bit of trivia.
One of the first all metal shoulder plane makers was E P Preston whose design was continued when they where bought out by the firm Record.The design was so well loved that it is produced today almost unchanged by firms such as Clifford and Lie Neilson.

Enjoy it Billy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the info Billy...You are correct on the infill wood and wedge...Both are mahogany. Your theory makes a lot of sense. Thanks again. Any idea of a preferred angle on the blade? Current angle appears to be about 10degrees.
 

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Roger the rule of thumb is for any plane where the bedding angle of the iron is less than 35 degrees the iron is fitted bevel up.I have 2 shoulder planes with a bedding angle of 20 degrees and a block plane that is even less all of them I grind just as my bevel down planes,thats 30 degree grind and 25 degree hone on all of them.

You may think that with bevel up and putting a fine hone of say 10 degrees on the iron you could get some fine shavings off your stock, maybe? But if you hit curly grain in your stock then your really going to dig into it,in fact when this happens you go the other way by putting a 50 degree grind on the iron and then this turns the plane into a scraper,you pay your money and you take your chance.

Middle of the road grind 30 hone 25,just a heads up but its usual for the irons on these planes to be just a tad wider than the plane over time somebody may have ground yours flush with the plane but it may pay you just to check.

If it is wider leave it like that because that's the way it should be its made like that so you can get right in to the corner of the job but just check its flush every time you use it. enjoy it Billy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks again for all the info...I think I'll do a little work on it using your suggested angles. Looks like an interesting plane to use. Thanks again.
 
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