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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The search for my first table saw has kicked into high gear, with a current opportunity to buy a brand new Delta 36-640, with the extension plate and precision guide fence.

It's clearly exciting to think about ripping more than what can be flipped on the sliding miter, and finished with a jigsaw. But this brings lots of questions... mainly, can this 10 yr old technology, right-tilt blade, 13amp and 3000 RPMs saw hold its own against some of the newer competition? And how much under $300 for this to become a screaming deal?

Some used ones that have been on the radar, and are all more expensive than the brand spankin new Delta:
Bosch 4100 on the gravity rise stand
Jet JWTS-10
Ridgid TS3650

Or, could wait for a sale and grab a Ridgid4512 with lifetime warranty and overwhelming reviews.

Appreciate any experience you can share about these or another that should be on the short list, cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great read you built there Scott, thanks. Pretty sure I saw the benchtop and contractor pictures referenced in another post as "what not to buy" and "what to look for" respectively.

Am I mistaken in thinking that the 36-640 is a belt drive? One part I'm noticing is its potential lack of a riving knife, which could be a deal breaker in and of itself.

Definitely focused on the contractor saws vs the benchtop, had to throw the Bosch in there because of my own 4410 and all the reviews of the 4100.

Any others in that 300-500 range that should be on the shortlist?
 

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If you need a portable saw, the Bosch is a good one, but it doesn't offer the potential of a larger full size belt drive saw IMO.

A riving knife and a traditional splitter essentially accomplish the same thing. A good riving knife is a "better mousetrap" IMO, but I wouldn't want it to be a reason for passing up a great deal on a good saw. I'd rather have a saw with good basic bones and an older style splitter than a smaller less substantial saw that has a riving knife. Just my opionion...YMMV.
 

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I think that's Delta's contractor model, not the smaller motorized model. It's a very substantial saw. New, they ran around $800. There were different rip fences over the years. I still use one with an older Jetlock fence that I like, locks down front and rear which is great for power feeders and stiff feather boards. Will accept a 13/16" dado, same throat plate and miter gauge as a cabinet saw. Big difference in power when changing to 220v, regardless of what the electrical arguers say. This motor steps up at 220. I wouldn't hesitate at $300. Ripping long 2" hardwoods can tax it at 110v. It's a far cry from the portable saws. The open back isn't the greatest for dust collection but it's OK with enough DC power.
 

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I suppose the question has already been sufficiently answered, but I figured I would throw my two cents in.

If you plan on being somewhat serious about woodworking (and if you have the space) definitely go with a belt drive contractor saw.

From what I understand, riving knives in contractor and portable saws are kind of a new thing. I wouldn't pass up a good deal on a good saw just because it didn't have a riving knife.
 

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Use or new,well, it still depends on your budget and type of work you'll be dealing with the saw. 4512 has many good features . Make more search of used saws on CL or ebay. If there's no luck , grab R4512.
 
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