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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
I've seen many woodworking videos where wood workers use brad nail guns to fasten pieces of wood quickly. My question here is, what is the average brad nail size used to nail wood pieces quickly? I'm in the process of buying one that can hold ba brad nails up to 2" long. I'm not buying any fancy stuff, just a reliable gun that does the job.
 

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John
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Hello all,
I've seen many woodworking videos where wood workers use brad nail guns to fasten pieces of wood quickly. My question here is, what is the average brad nail size used to nail wood pieces quickly? I'm in the process of buying one that can hold ba brad nails up to 2" long. I'm not buying any fancy stuff, just a reliable gun that does the job.
2" capacity is the way to go. You can always get shorter brads. First brad nailer I had, I bought the 1-1/4" variety because it was on sale and pretty cheap. The first job I had for it was to put up some 3/4" molding over 1/2" drywall.....:thumbdown:. I was outa nail long before the molding was fastened.:laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
2" capacity is the way to go. You can always get shorter brads. First brad nailer I had, I bought the 1-1/4" variety because it was on sale and pretty cheap. The first job I had for it was to put up some 3/4" molding over 1/2" drywall.....:thumbdown:. I was outa nail long before the molding was fastened.:laughing:
Looks like my thoughts were right. I was leaning towards the 2" type. Thanks for the input.
 

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Pin nailer....brad gun....finish nailer.If you spec them out WRT fastener length you'll see some overlaps.No biggy,just sayin.

We have several of each of the above.You'll find that you'll "settle in" on certain fastener lengths on "your" guns.Thats the important part of this.Get a few different lengths on whatever type gun you're loading for.....after a while,you'll see which lengths get used the most in,YOUR applications.

Be extremely prudent(I won't use it)with "teflon tape" on airgun fittings.The stuff never was intended to be a "sealant"....it was developed to aid in assembly.What happens on airguns,like those in a WW'ing shop is....and I can't explain it very welll...is the tape sort of turns gummy.Don't ask me how,but it'll find its way into gun's inards.We use pipe "dope" made for gas lines(gasoline),and it only takes a smidge.
 

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I use one that has up to 2 inch capacity and have had no problems. Really reasonable at HF-come to think of it, it's called a finish nailer. And I have run quite a few through it.
Dave H
 

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I've had a Porter Cable 2 inch for several years.....
Whatever brand you buy, you'll wonder how you got along without it...
Makes working alone much easier....

Sent to y'all offen' a iPad thing......
 

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Brad nailers that can accept fasteners up to 2" are the way to go. These are likely the 18ga type. Keep in mind that a 2" 18ga brad nail can get unpredictable in fastening hardwoods. Along with that caveat, if a more robust brad is needed, you might use a 16ga.

As long as fasteners are the topic consider that narrow crown staples have their place in a variety of woodworking situations. They hold backs in cabinets better than brad nails. Staples can be used for non visible mechanical fastening.

Air actuated fastener guns should be lubricated on a daily basis if used daily. Fingers should be kept clear of the area where a fastener is placed. Eye protection should be used. Safety nose lock up mechanism should not be defeated.






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So excuse my ignorance. I don't own and have never used a nail gun. I'll be installing baseboards and shoe molding on wallboard and hardwood flooring in 4-5 rooms and a hallway. What should I get for this? 2" brad nailer? What style and or size air compressor?
 

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John
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So excuse my ignorance. I don't own and have never used a nail gun. I'll be installing baseboards and shoe molding on wallboard and hardwood flooring in 4-5 rooms and a hallway. What should I get for this? 2" brad nailer? What style and or size air compressor?
Hi Mark - 18 gauge brad gun doesn't take much air. One of the small pancake/tank airless compressors should be fine. Needs to generate at least 100 psi as the nailer likely wants 70-90. Should be able to find one for much less than $100 new... used???
I use a Porter Cable pancake compressor (C2002?) but I have nailers from a 23 gauge micropinner to an 11 or 12 gauge framer. :smile:
 

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Snip
Air actuated fastener guns should be lubricated on a daily basis if used daily.
Only nailers that are not oil-less should be oiled, if they are oil-less you will gum them up and they will not work eventually until they are taken apart and cleaned. DAMHIKT
 

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The guns that take up to 2" brads will also take the shorter nails as well. I use the porter cable. No problems. I also have senco, bostich, and paslode. All of which never have given me trouble. Oil them as needed (if it needs it, it should be marked at or near the hook up) and they'll do the job.

As Cabinetman said, narrow guage crown staplers will work well for certain applications as well. I use the porter cable version. That one seems to not leave as much of an imprint as the rest.
 

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What do you think about this deal? $99 for the Porter Cable compressor AND brad nailer.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/20...Air-Compressor-and-2-Brad-Nailer-Package.aspx

One problem is that I want instant gratification and it wouldn't ship until after June 20. I can do anything I want tomorrow, Father's Day, except have sex with women I am not married to. (I asked.) So I was hoping to nail other things. But for this price I could wait.
 

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John
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What do you think about this deal? $99 for the Porter Cable compressor AND brad nailer.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/20...Air-Compressor-and-2-Brad-Nailer-Package.aspx

One problem is that I want instant gratification and it wouldn't ship until after June 20. I can do anything I want tomorrow, Father's Day, except have sex with women I am not married to. (I asked.) So I was hoping to nail other things. But for this price I could wait.
Not a bad price for the package at all. You won't be able to go up much in terms of tools requiring more air demand, ie spraying paint or using air ratchets... even larger nailers could tax the compressor but for what you are looking for it looks pretty good. I think I paid more than that for my reconditioned compressor (150 psi/6 gal tank). The nailer looks pretty good also, 5/8" to 2" is about as good as it gets as far as fastener range in 18 gauge.. Some out there may be better but also cost more.
It doesn't look like the package includes hoses and fittings though so you will need to budget extra for that. That stuff is available at most BB/auto supply/other anyway. Just a caution though; all fittings are not the same. There are at least half a dozen different configurations and most don't play together. Not a big issue, just sometimes frustrating. Find a configuration you like and settle on it so when you add to your collection (you will:laughing:) you can make sure all the stuff works together.
Good Luck:smile:
 

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I just ordered it - for free. My wife gave me a WoodCraft gift card for Valentines Day. $150.

Total with Virginia taxes and shipping was $116.58

Gentlemen, many thanks for your help! Take the rest of the day off. Cheers.
 

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ahhhh.... maybe, just maybe, you jumped the gun. There are pinners, brad nailers, and finish nailers. For the skirting around the base of the wall, I would strongly reccommend a finish nailer, not a brad nailer. Brads are simply really skinny, undersized, almost headless, finish nails, and won't hold the skirting too well.

You use brads on small stuff, with or without glue.

You use pins with glue - as The Normster used to say "to hold the molding until the glue sets up".

Also, I recommend buying a better compressor - bigger, with more capacity. This allows you to do some spraying with a cub gun. My Senco PC0968 will give me 4cfm, and it's oil-less, so the air isn't contaminated with oil, which allows spraying paint and other tasks where you don't want oil... If your tool requires oil you can either oil it through the air inlet or buy an inexpensive in-line oiler.
 

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John
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ahhhh.... maybe, just maybe, you jumped the gun. There are pinners, brad nailers, and finish nailers. For the skirting around the base of the wall, I would strongly reccommend a finish nailer, not a brad nailer. Brads are simply really skinny, undersized, almost headless, finish nails, and won't hold the skirting too well.

You use brads on small stuff, with or without glue.

You use pins with glue - as The Normster used to say "to hold the molding until the glue sets up".

Also, I recommend buying a better compressor - bigger, with more capacity. This allows you to do some spraying with a cub gun. My Senco PC0968 will give me 4cfm, and it's oil-less, so the air isn't contaminated with oil, which allows spraying paint and other tasks where you don't want oil... If your tool requires oil you can either oil it through the air inlet or buy an inexpensive in-line oiler.
Sorry Ed - I must respectfully disagree with most of that.
First, the 18 gauge is probably one of the most used guns in my inventory, usually for molding although I do use a 16 gauge sparingly on door and base molding, only through the thicker parts, 18 gauge for the thinner sections. If I am going to depend on glue and only want a pin to hold until the glue cures, a 23 gauge is the ticket. A drop of water will usually raise the grain enough to cover the pin so filling isn't needed. A 16 gauge finish nail leaves a pretty big hole to fill relative to the 18.
Secondly, if an oil lubricated compressor is contaminating the output air with oil I would submit that there is a compressor problem, likely with the rings, and probably wouldn't build to specified pressure. JMHO:smile:
 

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I agree, I mostly use my 18 gauge unless it's hardwood, then the 16 gauge. I used my pin nailer for the top moulding in our kitchen and you can't even see the small holes.

I started out with the 18 gauge and used it for years before starting to get the others as needed.
 
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